Aurora borealis
Aurora Au*ro"ra, n.; pl. E. {Auroras}, L. (rarely used) {Auror[ae]}. [L. aurora, for ausosa, akin to Gr. ?, ?, dawn, Skr. ushas, and E. east.] 1. The rising light of the morning; the dawn of day; the redness of the sky just before the sun rises. [1913 Webster]

2. The rise, dawn, or beginning. --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster]

3. (Class. Myth.) The Roman personification of the dawn of day; the goddess of the morning. The poets represented her a rising out of the ocean, in a chariot, with rosy fingers dropping gentle dew. [1913 Webster]

4. (Bot.) A species of crowfoot. --Johnson. [1913 Webster]

5. The aurora borealis or aurora australis (northern or southern lights). [1913 Webster]

{Aurora borealis}, i. e., northern daybreak; popularly called northern lights. A luminous meteoric phenomenon, visible only at night, and supposed to be of electrical origin. This species of light usually appears in streams, ascending toward the zenith from a dusky line or bank, a few degrees above the northern horizon; when reaching south beyond the zenith, it forms what is called the corona, about a spot in the heavens toward which the dipping needle points. Occasionally the aurora appears as an arch of light across the heavens from east to west. Sometimes it assumes a wavy appearance, and the streams of light are then called merry dancers. They assume a variety of colors, from a pale red or yellow to a deep red or blood color. The

{Aurora australis}is a corresponding phenomenon in the southern hemisphere, the streams of light ascending in the same manner from near the southern horizon. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Aurora borealis — bezeichnet: das Nord bzw. Polarlicht einen geplanten Forschungseisbrecher, siehe Aurora Borealis (Forschungsschiff) das 4. Klavierkonzert op. 130 des norwegischen Komponisten Geirr Tveitt eine norwegische Natursteinsorte (Migmatit) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Aurora Borealis — bezeichnet: das Nord bzw. Polarlicht einen geplanten Forschungseisbrecher, siehe Aurora Borealis (Schiff) das 4. Klavierkonzert op. 130 des norwegischen Komponisten Geirr Tveitt eine norwegische Natursteinsorte (Migmatit) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • aurora borealis — 1620s, Northern Lights, lit. northern dawn, said to have been coined by French philosopher Petrus Gassendus (1592 1655) after a spectacular display seen in France Sept. 2, 1621; see AURORA (Cf. aurora) + BOREAL (Cf. boreal). In northern Scotland… …   Etymology dictionary

  • aurora borealis — [bôr΄ē al′is, bôr΄ē ā′lis] n. [L, lit., northern aurora: see AURORA1 & BOREAS] irregular, luminous phenomena, as streamers, visible at night in a zone surrounding the north magnetic pole and produced in the ionosphere when atomic particles strike …   English World dictionary

  • Aurora borealis — Aurora borealis, das Nordlicht …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • Aurora borealis — šiaurės pašvaistė statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. aurora borealis; northern light vok. Aurora borealis, f; Nordlicht, n rus. северное сияние, n pranc. aurore boréale, f …   Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • aurora borealis — šiaurės pašvaistė statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. aurora borealis; northern light vok. Aurora borealis, f; Nordlicht, n rus. северное сияние, n pranc. aurore boréale, f …   Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • Aurora Borealis —    Light radiated by atoms and ions in the ionosphere interacting with the planets gravitational field, usually seen at the magnetic North and South poles. Aurora Borealis is the aurora in the norhtern hemisphere, and Aurora Australis is the… …   The writer's dictionary of science fiction, fantasy, horror and mythology

  • Aurora borealis — Aurora; Nordlicht; Polarlicht …   Universal-Lexikon

  • aurora borealis — /bawr ee al is, ay lis, bohr /, Meteorol. the aurora of the Northern Hemisphere. Also called northern lights, aurora polaris. [1621; < NL: northern aurora; see BOREAL] * * * …   Universalium

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