Overpaid
Overpay O`ver*pay", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Overpaid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Overpaying}.] 1. To pay too much to; to reward too highly. [1913 Webster]

2. To pay too much for; as, to overpay the loan balance. [PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • overpaid — o‧ver‧paid [ˌəʊvəˈpeɪd◂ ǁ ˌoʊvər ] adjective HUMAN RESOURCES if someone is overpaid, they are paid too much for the job they do: • Many CEOs are overpaid and underworked bureaucrats. * * * overpaid UK US /ˌəʊvəˈpeɪd/ adjective ► an overpaid… …   Financial and business terms

  • overpaid — [[t]o͟ʊvə(r)pe͟ɪd[/t]] ADJ GRADED If you say that someone is overpaid, you mean that you think they are paid more than they deserve for the work they do. → See also overpay ...grossly overpaid corporate lawyers …   English dictionary

  • overpaid — o|ver|paid [ˌəuvəˈpeıd US ˌouvər ] adj given more money for a job than you deserve ≠ ↑underpaid ▪ grossly overpaid football players …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • overpaid — o|ver|paid1 [ ,ouvər peıd ] adjective being paid more money than you deserve for the work you do overpaid o|ver|paid 2 the past tense and past participle of overpay …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • overpaid — /ˌəυvə peɪd/ adjective paid too much ● Our staff are overpaid and underworked …   Dictionary of banking and finance

  • overpaid — adj. paid too much; given a salary that is too high ,o·ver pay || ‚əʊvÉ™(r) peɪ v. pay too much; give a salary that is too high …   English contemporary dictionary

  • overpaid — past and past participle of overpay …   English new terms dictionary

  • overpaid — I UK [ˌəʊvə(r)ˈpeɪd] / US [ˌoʊvərˈpeɪd] adjective being paid more money than you deserve for the work that you do II UK [ˌəʊvə(r)ˈpeɪd] / US [ˌoʊvərˈpeɪd] overpay …   English dictionary

  • overpaid — past and past part. of OVERPAY …   Useful english dictionary

  • overpaid, oversexed, and over here — Meaning Origin Gibe at the expense of the US army in Europe during the Second World War. Widely attributed to the British comedian Tommy Trinder …   Meaning and origin of phrases

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