outfangthef
outfangthef out*fang"thef, n. [AS. [=u]t-fangen-[thorn]e['o]f. See {Out}, {Fang}, v. t., and {Thief}.] (Anglo-Saxon & O. Eng. Law) (a) A thief from without or abroad, taken within a lord's fee or liberty. (b) The privilege of trying such a thief. --Burrill. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • outfangthef — /awtfaengffiyf/ A liberty or privilege in the ancient common law, whereby a lord was enabled to call any man dwelling in his manor, and taken for felony in another place out of his fee, to judgment in his own court. See infangenthef …   Black's law dictionary

  • outfangthef — A thief who was captured outside the manor; a tenant who was arrested for larceny within a manor …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • infangenthef — /infaerjandiyf/ In old English law, a privilege of lords of certain manors to judge any thief taken within their fee. See outfangthef …   Black's law dictionary

  • infangenthef — /infaerjandiyf/ In old English law, a privilege of lords of certain manors to judge any thief taken within their fee. See outfangthef …   Black's law dictionary

  • utfangthefe — Same as outfangthef …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • outfangthief — ˈau̇tfəŋˌthēf noun Etymology: Middle English outfangenthef, outfangthef, from Old English ūtfangenethēof, from ūt out + fangen (past participle of fōn to seize, capture) + thēof thief more at out, pact, thief : the right of a lord under medieval… …   Useful english dictionary

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