Out of the way
Way Way, n. [OE. wey, way, AS. weg; akin to OS., D., OHG., & G. weg, Icel. vegr, Sw. v["a]g, Dan. vei, Goth. wigs, L. via, and AS. wegan to move, L. vehere to carry, Skr. vah. [root]136. Cf. {Convex}, {Inveigh}, {Vehicle}, {Vex}, {Via}, {Voyage}, {Wag}, {Wagon}, {Wee}, {Weigh}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That by, upon, or along, which one passes or processes; opportunity or room to pass; place of passing; passage; road, street, track, or path of any kind; as, they built a way to the mine. ``To find the way to heaven.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

I shall him seek by way and eke by street. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The way seems difficult, and steep to scale. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The season and ways were very improper for his majesty's forces to march so great a distance. --Evelyn. [1913 Webster]

2. Length of space; distance; interval; as, a great way; a long way. [1913 Webster]

And whenever the way seemed long, Or his heart began to fail. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster]

3. A moving; passage; procession; journey. [1913 Webster]

I prythee, now, lead the way. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. Course or direction of motion or process; tendency of action; advance. [1913 Webster]

If that way be your walk, you have not far. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

And let eternal justice take the way. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

5. The means by which anything is reached, or anything is accomplished; scheme; device; plan. [1913 Webster]

My best way is to creep under his gaberdine. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

By noble ways we conquest will prepare. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

What impious ways my wishes took! --Prior. [1913 Webster]

6. Manner; method; mode; fashion; style; as, the way of expressing one's ideas. [1913 Webster]

7. Regular course; habitual method of life or action; plan of conduct; mode of dealing. ``Having lost the way of nobleness.'' --Sir. P. Sidney. [1913 Webster]

Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace. --Prov. iii. 17. [1913 Webster]

When men lived in a grander way. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster]

8. Sphere or scope of observation. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

The public ministers that fell in my way. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster]

9. Determined course; resolved mode of action or conduct; as, to have one's way. [1913 Webster]

10. (Naut.) (a) Progress; as, a ship has way. (b) pl. The timbers on which a ship is launched. [1913 Webster]

11. pl. (Mach.) The longitudinal guides, or guiding surfaces, on the bed of a planer, lathe, or the like, along which a table or carriage moves. [1913 Webster]

12. (Law) Right of way. See below. [1913 Webster]

{By the way}, in passing; apropos; aside; apart from, though connected with, the main object or subject of discourse.

{By way of}, for the purpose of; as being; in character of.

{Covert way}. (Fort.) See {Covered way}, under {Covered}.

{In the family way}. See under {Family}.

{In the way}, so as to meet, fall in with, obstruct, hinder, etc.

{In the way with}, traveling or going with; meeting or being with; in the presence of.

{Milky way}. (Astron.) See {Galaxy}, 1.

{No way}, {No ways}. See {Noway}, {Noways}, in the Vocabulary.

{On the way}, traveling or going; hence, in process; advancing toward completion; as, on the way to this country; on the way to success.

{Out of the way}. See under {Out}.

{Right of way} (Law), a right of private passage over another's ground. It may arise either by grant or prescription. It may be attached to a house, entry, gate, well, or city lot, as well as to a country farm. --Kent.

{To be under way}, or {To have way} (Naut.), to be in motion, as when a ship begins to move.

{To give way}. See under {Give}.

{To go one's way}, or {To come one's way}, to go or come; to depart or come along. --Shak.

{To go one's way} to proceed in a manner favorable to one; -- of events.

{To come one's way} to come into one's possession (of objects) or to become available, as an opportunity; as, good things will come your way.

{To go the way of all the earth} or

{to go the way of all flesh} to die.

{To make one's way}, to advance in life by one's personal efforts.

{To make way}. See under {Make}, v. t.

{Ways and means}. (a) Methods; resources; facilities. (b) (Legislation) Means for raising money; resources for revenue.

{Way leave}, permission to cross, or a right of way across, land; also, rent paid for such right. [Eng]

{Way of the cross} (Eccl.), the course taken in visiting in rotation the stations of the cross. See {Station}, n., 7 (c) .

{Way of the rounds} (Fort.), a space left for the passage of the rounds between a rampart and the wall of a fortified town.

{Way pane}, a pane for cartage in irrigated land. See {Pane}, n., 4. [Prov. Eng.]

{Way passenger}, a passenger taken up, or set down, at some intermediate place between the principal stations on a line of travel.

{Ways of God}, his providential government, or his works.

{Way station}, an intermediate station between principal stations on a line of travel, especially on a railroad.

{Way train}, a train which stops at the intermediate, or way, stations; an accommodation train.

{Way warden}, the surveyor of a road. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Street; highway; road.

Usage: {Way}, {Street}, {Highway}, {Road}. Way is generic, denoting any line for passage or conveyance; a highway is literally one raised for the sake of dryness and convenience in traveling; a road is, strictly, a way for horses and carriages; a street is, etymologically, a paved way, as early made in towns and cities; and, hence, the word is distinctively applied to roads or highways in compact settlements. [1913 Webster]

All keep the broad highway, and take delight With many rather for to go astray. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

There is but one road by which to climb up. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

When night Darkens the streets, then wander forth the sons Of Belial, flown with insolence and wine. --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • out of the way — {adv. phr.} 1. Not where people usually go; difficult to reach. * /When little Tommy comes to visit her, Aunt Sally puts her lamps and vases out of the way./ Often used with hyphens before a noun. * /Gold was found in an out of the way village in …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • out of the way — {adv. phr.} 1. Not where people usually go; difficult to reach. * /When little Tommy comes to visit her, Aunt Sally puts her lamps and vases out of the way./ Often used with hyphens before a noun. * /Gold was found in an out of the way village in …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Out of the way — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Out-of-the-way — a. 1. See under {Out}, adv. [1913 Webster] 2. Not on a main transportation route; inconveniently located. [WordNet 1.5 +PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • out of the way — phrasal 1. wrong, improper < didn t know I d said anything out of the way > 2. a. in or to a secluded place b. unusual, remarkable < there s nothing out of the way about the plan > 3. done, completed < got his homework ou …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • out-of-the-way — adjective Date: 1704 1. unusual < out of the way information > 2. being off the beaten track < an out of the way restaurant > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • To put out of the way — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • put out of the way — {v. phr.} To kill. * /When people spoke against the dictator, he had them put out of the way./ * /The old dog was very sick, and Father had the animal doctor put him out of the way./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • put out of the way — {v. phr.} To kill. * /When people spoke against the dictator, he had them put out of the way./ * /The old dog was very sick, and Father had the animal doctor put him out of the way./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get out of the way — See: OUT OF THE WAY …   Dictionary of American idioms

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