Or
Or Or, n. [F., fr. L. aurum gold. Cf. {Aureate}.] (Her.) Yellow or gold color, -- represented in drawing or engraving by small dots. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Or — ([^o]r), conj. [OE. or, outher, other, auther, either, or, AS. [=a]w[eth]er, contr. from [=a]hw[ae][eth]er; [=a] aye + hw[ae][eth]er whether. See {Aye}, and {Whether}, and cf. {Either}.] A particle that marks an alternative; as, you may read or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • -or — suff. [L. or: cf. OF. or, ur, our, F. eur.] 1. A noun suffix denoting an act; a state or quality; as in error, fervor, pallor, candor, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. A noun suffix denoting an agent or doer; as in auditor, one who hears; donor, one who… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Or — Or, prep. & adv. [AS. ?r ere, before. [root]204. See {Ere}, prep. & adv.] Ere; before; sooner than. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] But natheless, while I have time and space, Or that I forther in this tale pace. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] {Or ever}, {Or ere} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • OR — s. m. Métal d un jaune brillant, très ductile, très pesant, mou, inaltérable à l air, insoluble dans les acides, et dont on fait les monnaies de la plus haute valeur, les ouvrages de bijouterie les plus précieux. Bon or. Vrai or. Faux or. Or pur …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • OR — n. m. Métal d’un jaune brillant, très ductile, très pesant, inaltérable à l’air, à l’eau, dont on fait les monnaies de la plus haute valeur et les ouvrages de bijouterie. Or pur. Or fin. Or au titre. Or à vingt quatre carats. Or vierge. Or de… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 8eme edition (1935)

  • or — I. conjunction Etymology: Middle English, alteration of other, alteration of Old English oththe; akin to Old High German eddo or Date: 13th century 1. used as a function word to indicate an alternative < coffee or tea > < sink or swim >, the… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • OR — Particule dont on se sert pour lier un discours à un autre. Or, pour revenir à ce que nous disions.   Il sert aussi à lier une proposition à une autre, comme la mineure d un argument à la majeure. Le sage est heureux : or Socrate est sage, ou or… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • -or — I. noun suffix Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French ur, our, eour & Latin or; Anglo French ur, our, from Latin or; Anglo French eour, from Latin ator, from a , verb stem + tor, agent suffix; akin to Greek tōr, agent suffix, Sanskrit tā… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • or — Candlenut Can dle*nut , n. 1. The fruit of a euphorbiaceous tree or shrub ({Aleurites moluccana}), native of some of the Pacific islands. It is used by the natives as a candle, the nut kernels being strung together. The oil from the nut ( {),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • OR — I. noun Etymology: 1or Date: circa 1956 a logical operator that requires either of two inputs to be present or conditions to be met for an output to be made or a statement to be executed < OR gate in a computer > II. abbreviation 1. operating… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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