attraction of gravitation
Gravitation Grav"i*ta"tion, n. [Cf. F. gravitation. See Gravity.] 1. The act of gravitating. [1913 Webster]

2. (Pysics) That species of attraction or force by which all bodies or particles of matter in the universe tend toward each other; called also {attraction of gravitation}, {universal gravitation}, and {universal gravity}. See {Attraction}, and {Weight.} [1913 Webster]

{Law of gravitation}, that law in accordance with which gravitation acts, namely, that every two bodies or portions of matter in the universe attract each other with a force proportional directly to the quantity of matter they contain, and inversely to the squares of their distances. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Attraction of gravitation — Attraction At*trac tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Law of gravitation — Gravitation Grav i*ta tion, n. [Cf. F. gravitation. See Gravity.] 1. The act of gravitating. [1913 Webster] 2. (Pysics) That species of attraction or force by which all bodies or particles of matter in the universe tend toward each other; called… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Le Sage's theory of gravitation — is the most common name for the kinetic theory of gravity originally proposed by Nicolas Fatio de Duillier in 1690 and later by Georges Louis Le Sage in 1748. The theory proposed a mechanical explanation for Newton s gravitational force in terms… …   Wikipedia

  • Mechanical explanations of gravitation — (or kinetic theories of gravitation) are attempts to explain the action of gravity by aid of basic mechanical processes, such as pressure forces caused by pushes, and without the use of any action at a distance. These theories were developed from …   Wikipedia

  • Gravitation — Grav i*ta tion, n. [Cf. F. gravitation. See Gravity.] 1. The act of gravitating. [1913 Webster] 2. (Pysics) That species of attraction or force by which all bodies or particles of matter in the universe tend toward each other; called also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Attraction — At*trac tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gravitation — is a natural phenomenon by which objects with mass attract one another [http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/GR/grav speed.html Does Gravity Travel at the Speed of Light?] , UCR Mathematics . 1998. Retrieved 3 July 2008] . In everyday …   Wikipedia

  • gravitation — gravitational, adj. gravitationally, adv. /grav i tay sheuhn/, n. 1. Physics. a. the force of attraction between any two masses. Cf. law of gravitation. b. an act or process caused by this force. 2. a sinking or falling …   Universalium

  • gravitation — The force of attraction between any two bodies in the universe, varying directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between their centers; expressed as F = Gm1m2l−2, where G (Newtonian constant of g.) =… …   Medical dictionary

  • Gravitation constant — Constant Con stant, n. 1. That which is not subject to change; that which is invariable. [1913 Webster] 2. (Math.) A quantity that does not change its value; used in countradistinction to {variable}. [1913 Webster] 3. (Astron.) A number whose… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”