On and on
On On, adv. [See {On}, prep.] 1. Forward, in progression; onward; -- usually with a verb of motion; as, move on; go on; the beat goes on. ``Time glides on.'' --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

The path is smooth that leadeth on to danger. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Forward, in succession; as, from father to son, from the son to the grandson, and so on. [1913 Webster]

3. In continuance; without interruption or ceasing; as, sleep on, take your ease; say on; sing on. [1913 Webster]

4. Adhering; not off; as in the phrase, ``He is neither on nor off,'' that is, he is not steady, he is irresolute. [1913 Webster]

5. Attached to the body, as clothing or ornament, or for use. ``I have boots on.'' --B. Gonson. [1913 Webster]

He put on righteousness as a breastplate. --Is. lix. 17. [1913 Webster]

6. In progress; proceeding; ongoing; as, a game is on. [1913 Webster]

Note: On is sometimes used as an exclamation, or a command to move or proceed, some verb being understood; as, on, comrades; that is, go on, move on. [1913 Webster]

{On and on}, continuously; for a long time together. ``Toiling on and on and on.'' --Longfellow. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • on and off — See: OFF AND ON …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • on and off — See: OFF AND ON …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • on the wane and on the wax — {adv. phr.} Decreasing and increasing. Said of the moon. * /The moon is regularly on the wane and on the wax at regular intervals lasting half a month./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • on the wane and on the wax — {adv. phr.} Decreasing and increasing. Said of the moon. * /The moon is regularly on the wane and on the wax at regular intervals lasting half a month./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • on and off — adverb Date: 1748 off and on • on and off adjective …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • on-and-off — adjective see on and off …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • off and on — also[on and off] {adv.} Not regularly; occasionally; sometimes. * /Joan wrote to a pen pal in England off and on for several years./ * /It rained off and on all day./ Sometimes used with hyphens like an adjective. * /A worn out cord may make a… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • off and on — also[on and off] {adv.} Not regularly; occasionally; sometimes. * /Joan wrote to a pen pal in England off and on for several years./ * /It rained off and on all day./ Sometimes used with hyphens like an adjective. * /A worn out cord may make a… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Off and on — Off Off ([o^]f; 115), adv. [OE. of, orig. the same word as R. of, prep., AS. of, adv. & prep. [root]194. See {Of}.] In a general sense, denoting from or away from; as: [1913 Webster] 1. Denoting distance or separation; as, the house is a mile off …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • off-and-on — adj. discontinuous; not continuous. Opposite of {continuous}. [prenominal] Syn: interrupted. [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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