Accidie
Accidie \Ac"ci*die\, n. [OF. accide, accidie, LL. accidia, acedia, fr. Gr. ?; 'a priv. + ? care.] Sloth; torpor. [Obs.] ``The sin of accidie.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • accidie — [ak sid′ē əak′sə dē΄] n. ACEDIA: also accidia [ak sid′ē ə] …   English World dictionary

  • accidie — noun /ˈæksɪdɪ/ Sloth; torpor , The sin of accidie …   Wiktionary

  • accidie — n. laziness, sloth, apathy. Etymology: ME f. AF accidie f. OF accide f. med.L accidia …   Useful english dictionary

  • accidie — noun Date: 13th century acedia …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • accidie — /ak si dee/, n. acedia. [1200 50; ME < ML accidia (alter. of LL acedia ACEDIA); r. ME accide < OF] * * * …   Universalium

  • accidie — State that inhibits pleasure and prompts the rejection of life; one of the Seven Deadly Sins . Aquinas associates it with turning one s back on things, through depression or self hatred, and nicely defines it as a torpor of spirit which prevents… …   Philosophy dictionary

  • Accidie — What today we might call depression: a torpid state, lacking interest in anything and suggesting sloth. It was a condition which afflicted monks, as despair was considered one of the seven deadly sins. [< Lat. acedia = weariness of body or… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Accidie — Despondency, depression, listlessness, a distaste for life without any specific reason …   Dictionary of church terms

  • accidie — n. acedia, apathy, listlessness, indifference; boredom; torpor …   English contemporary dictionary

  • accidie — [ aksɪdi] noun literary spiritual or mental sloth. Origin ME: via OFr. from med. L. accidia, alt. of acedia …   English new terms dictionary

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