Attempt to commit a crime
Attempt At*tempt", n. A essay, trial, or endeavor; an undertaking; an attack, or an effort to gain a point; esp. an unsuccessful, as contrasted with a successful, effort. [1913 Webster]

By his blindness maimed for high attempts. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{Attempt to commit a crime} (Law), such an intentional preparatory act as will apparently result, if not extrinsically hindered, in a crime which it was designed to effect. --Wharton. [1913 Webster]

Syn: {Attempt}, {Endeavor}, {Effort}, {Exertion}, {Trial}.

Usage: These words agree in the idea of calling forth our powers into action. Trial is the generic term; it denotes a putting forth of one's powers with a view to determine what they can accomplish; as, to make trial of one's strength. An attempt is always directed to some definite and specific object; as, ``The attempt, and not the deed, confounds us.'' --Shak. An endeavor is a continued attempt; as, ``His high endeavor and his glad success.'' --Cowper. Effort is a specific putting forth of strength in order to carry out an attempt. Exertion is the putting forth or active exercise of any faculty or power. ``It admits of all degrees of effort and even natural action without effort.'' --C. J. Smith. See {Try}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • List of To Kill a Mockingbird characters — To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1960 novel by American Author Harper Lee. It is often considered a great work of American literature, and is widely read in high school English and literature classes. The novel is set in the fictional Maycomb County,… …   Wikipedia

  • attempt — at·tempt n: the crime of having the intent to commit and taking action in an effort to commit a crime that fails or is prevented – called also criminal attempt; see also impossibility ◇ There is no settled answer to how close to completing a… …   Law dictionary

  • Attempt — At*tempt , n. A essay, trial, or endeavor; an undertaking; an attack, or an effort to gain a point; esp. an unsuccessful, as contrasted with a successful, effort. [1913 Webster] By his blindness maimed for high attempts. Milton. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • attempt — In statutes and in cases other than criminal prosecutions an attempt ordinarily means an intent combined with an act falling short of the thing intended. It may be described as an endeavor to do an act, carried beyond mere preparation, but short… …   Black's law dictionary

  • attempt — In statutes and in cases other than criminal prosecutions an attempt ordinarily means an intent combined with an act falling short of the thing intended. It may be described as an endeavor to do an act, carried beyond mere preparation, but short… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Crime prevention — is the attempt to reduce victimization and to deter crime and criminals. It is applied specifically to efforts made by governments to reduce crime, enforce the law, and maintain criminal justice. Contents 1 Studies 2 Types 3 Bibliography …   Wikipedia

  • crime — crimeless, adj. crimelessness, n. /kruym/, n. 1. an action or an instance of negligence that is deemed injurious to the public welfare or morals or to the interests of the state and that is legally prohibited. 2. criminal activity and those… …   Universalium

  • attempt — Any overt act done with the intent to commit a crime and which, but for the interference of some cause preventing the carrying out of the intent, would have resulted in the commission of the crime. It consists of two important elements: first, an …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • crime — A positive or negative act in violation of penal law; an offense against the State or United States. Crime and misdemeanor , properly speaking, are synonymous terms; though in common usage crime is made to denote such offenses as are of a more… …   Black's law dictionary

  • crime — A positive or negative act in violation of penal law; an offense against the State or United States. Crime and misdemeanor , properly speaking, are synonymous terms; though in common usage crime is made to denote such offenses as are of a more… …   Black's law dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”