Odd job

Odd job
Job Job (j[o^]b), n. [Prov. E. job, gob, n., a small piece of wood, v., to stab, strike; cf. E. gob, gobbet; perh. influenced by E. chop to cut off, to mince. See {Gob}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A sudden thrust or stab; a jab. [1913 Webster]

2. A piece of chance or occasional work; any definite work undertaken in gross for a fixed price; as, he did the job for a thousand dollars. [1913 Webster]

3. A public transaction done for private profit; something performed ostensibly as a part of official duty, but really for private gain; a corrupt official business. [1913 Webster]

4. Any affair or event which affects one, whether fortunately or unfortunately. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

5. A situation or opportunity of work; as, he lost his job. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

6. A task, or the execution of a task; as, Michelangelo did a great job on the David statue. [PJC]

7. (Computers) A task or coordinated set of tasks for a multitasking computer, submitted for processing as a single unit, usually for execution in background. See {job control language}. [PJC]

Note: Job is used adjectively to signify doing jobs, used for jobs, or let on hire to do jobs; as, job printer; job master; job horse; job wagon, etc. [1913 Webster]

{By the job}, at a stipulated sum for the work, or for each piece of work done; -- distinguished from {time work}; as, the house was built by the job.

{Job lot}, a quantity of goods, usually miscellaneous, sold out of the regular course of trade, at a certain price for the whole; as, these articles were included in a job lot.

{Job master}, one who lest out horses and carriages for hire, as for family use. [Eng.]

{Job printer}, one who does miscellaneous printing, esp. circulars, cards, billheads, etc.

{Odd job}, miscellaneous work of a petty kind; occasional work, of various kinds, or for various people.

{to do a job on}, to harm badly or destroy. [slang]

{on the job}, alert; performing a responsibility well. [slang] [1913 Webster +PJC]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Odd job — may refer to: Odd job , work that is not regular or skilled (e.g., part time or handyman work) Odd Job Stores, Inc. (located in the northeast and mid western U.S.), which was bought out by Amazing Savings Holding LLC in 2003, and which… …   Wikipedia

  • odd-job — adj. varied and irregularly performed; of paid labor; as, he found only odd job employment. [prenominal] [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • odd-job — odd job; odd job·ber; odd job·man; …   English syllables

  • odd-job — adjective not regular or skilled found only odd job employment • Similar to: ↑part time, ↑parttime * * * ˈ ̷ ̷| ̷ ̷ intransitive verb Etymology: from the noun phrase odd job …   Useful english dictionary

  • odd job — noun Temporary employment or a task of an incidental, unspecialized nature. He moved all over the States, without a cent, picking up any odd job he could get …   Wiktionary

  • odd-job — odd jobber. odd jobber, n. /od job /, v.i., odd jobbed, odd jobbing. to work at a series of unrelated or unspecialized jobs, often of a low paying or menial nature. [1855 60] * * * …   Universalium

  • odd job — n. usu. odd jobs a casual or isolated piece of work, esp. one of a routine domestic or manual nature Derivatives: odd jobber n. odd jobbing n …   Useful english dictionary

  • odd job — noun a casual or isolated piece of domestic or manual work. Derivatives odd jobber noun odd jobbing noun …   English new terms dictionary

  • odd job — Synonyms and related words: assignment, busywork, chare, charge, chore, commission, duty, errand, exercise, fish to fry, homework, job, job of work, labor, make work, matters in hand, mission, piece of work, project, service, stint, task, things… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • Odd Job Jack — Genre Animated television series Created by Smiley Guy Studios Directed by Adrian Carter Denny Silverthorne Jr …   Wikipedia

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