Obtuser
Obtuse Ob*tuse" a. [Compar. {Obtuser}; superl. {Obtusest}.] [L. obtusus, p. p. of obtundere to blunt: cf. F. obtus. See {Obtund}.] 1. Not pointed or acute; blunt; -- applied esp. to angles greater than a right angle, or containing more than ninety degrees. [1913 Webster]

2. Not having acute sensibility or perceptions; not alert, especially to the feelings of others; dull; stupid; as, obtuse senses. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. Dull; deadened; as, obtuse sound. --Johnson. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Obtuse — Ob*tuse a. [Compar. {Obtuser}; superl. {Obtusest}.] [L. obtusus, p. p. of obtundere to blunt: cf. F. obtus. See {Obtund}.] 1. Not pointed or acute; blunt; applied esp. to angles greater than a right angle, or containing more than ninety degrees.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Obtusest — Obtuse Ob*tuse a. [Compar. {Obtuser}; superl. {Obtusest}.] [L. obtusus, p. p. of obtundere to blunt: cf. F. obtus. See {Obtund}.] 1. Not pointed or acute; blunt; applied esp. to angles greater than a right angle, or containing more than ninety… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • obtuse — adjective (obtuser; est) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin obtusus blunt, dull, from past participle of obtundere to beat against, blunt, from ob against + tundere to beat more at ob , contusion Date: 15th century 1. a. not pointed or acute ; …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • obtus — obtus, use [ ɔpty, yz ] adj. • 1370; lat. obtusus « émoussé » 1 ♦ Rare Qui est émoussé, de forme arrondie. (1542) Géom. Angle obtus, plus grand qu un angle droit. Angle obtus de 100°. 2 ♦ (fin XVIe) Fig. Vx Ouïe, vue obtuse, qui manque d acuité.… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

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