Obtruding
Obtrude Ob*trude", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Obtruded}, p. pr. & vb. n. {Obtruding}.] [L. obtrudere, obtrusum; ob (see {Ob-}) + trudere to thrust. See {Threat}.] 1. To thrust impertinently; to present to a person without warrant or solicitation; as, to obtrude one's self upon a company; to obtrude one's opinion on another. [1913 Webster +PJC]

The objects of our senses obtrude their particular ideas upon our minds, whether we will or no. --Lock. [1913 Webster]

2. To offer with unreasonable importunity; to urge unduly or against the will. --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • obtruding — ob·trude || É™b truːd v. thrust outward; force (oneself or one s opinion on others); interrupt; invade …   English contemporary dictionary

  • obtruding — obtrudˈing noun and adjective • • • Main Entry: ↑obtrude …   Useful english dictionary

  • ob|trud´er — ob|trude «uhb TROOD», verb, trud|ed, trud|ing. –v.t. 1. to put forward unasked and unwanted; force: »Don t obtrude your opinions on others. He wouldn t obtrude his assistance, if it were declined (John L. Motley). 2. to push out; thrust forward:… …   Useful english dictionary

  • ob|trude — «uhb TROOD», verb, trud|ed, trud|ing. –v.t. 1. to put forward unasked and unwanted; force: »Don t obtrude your opinions on others. He wouldn t obtrude his assistance, if it were declined (John L. Motley). 2. to push out; thrust forward: »A turtle …   Useful english dictionary

  • Imposition — Im po*si tion, n. [F., fr. L. impositio the application of a name to a thing. See {Impone}.] 1. The act of imposing, laying on, affixing, enjoining, inflicting, obtruding, and the like. From imposition of strict laws. Milton. [1913 Webster] Made… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Obtrude — Ob*trude , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Obtruded}, p. pr. & vb. n. {Obtruding}.] [L. obtrudere, obtrusum; ob (see {Ob }) + trudere to thrust. See {Threat}.] 1. To thrust impertinently; to present to a person without warrant or solicitation; as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Obtruded — Obtrude Ob*trude , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Obtruded}, p. pr. & vb. n. {Obtruding}.] [L. obtrudere, obtrusum; ob (see {Ob }) + trudere to thrust. See {Threat}.] 1. To thrust impertinently; to present to a person without warrant or solicitation; as,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Obtrusion — Ob*tru sion, n. [L. obtrusio. See {Obtrude}.] 1. The act of obtruding; a thrusting upon others by force or unsolicited; as, the obtrusion of crude opinions on the world. [1913 Webster] 2. That which is obtruded. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • obtrude — verb (obtruded; obtruding) Etymology: Latin obtrudere to thrust at, from ob in the way + trudere to thrust more at ob , threat Date: circa 1609 transitive verb 1. to thrust out ; extrude 2. to force or impose (as oneself or one s ideas) without… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • obtrusion — noun Etymology: Late Latin obtrusion , obtrusio, from Latin obtrudere Date: 1579 1. an act of obtruding 2. something that is obtruded …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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