Object Ob"ject ([o^]b"j[e^]kt), n. [L. objectus. See {Object}, v. t.] 1. That which is put, or which may be regarded as put, in the way of some of the senses; something visible or tangible and persists for an appreciable time; as, he observed an object in the distance; all the objects in sight; he touched a strange object in the dark. [1913 Webster]

2. Anything which is set, or which may be regarded as set, before the mind so as to be apprehended or known; that of which the mind by any of its activities takes cognizance, whether a thing external in space or a conception formed by the mind itself; as, an object of knowledge, wonder, fear, thought, study, etc. [1913 Webster]

Object is a term for that about which the knowing subject is conversant; what the schoolmen have styled the ``materia circa quam.'' --Sir. W. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

The object of their bitterest hatred. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

3. That toward which the mind, or any of its activities, is directed; that on which the purpose are fixed as the end of action or effort; that which is sought for; goal; end; aim; motive; final cause. [1913 Webster]

Object, beside its proper signification, came to be abusively applied to denote motive, end, final cause . . . . This innovation was probably borrowed from the French. --Sir. W. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

Let our object be, our country, our whole country, and nothing but our country. --D. Webster. [1913 Webster]

4. Sight; show; appearance; aspect. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

He, advancing close Up to the lake, past all the rest, arose In glorious object. --Chapman. [1913 Webster]

5. (Gram.) A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb. [1913 Webster]

6. (Computers) Any set of data that is or can be manipulated or referenced by a computer program as a single entity; -- the term may be used broadly, to include files, images (such as icons on the screen), or small data structures. More narrowly, anything defined as an object within an object-oriented programming language. [PJC]

7. (Ontology) Anything which exists and which has attributes; distinguished from {attributes}, {processes}, and {relations}. [PJC]

{Object glass}, the lens, or system of lenses, placed at the end of a telescope, microscope, etc., which is toward the object. Its function is to form an image of the object, which is then viewed by the eyepiece. Called also {objective} or {objective lens}. See Illust. of {Microscope}.

{Object lesson}, a lesson in which object teaching is made use of.

{Object staff}. (Leveling) Same as {Leveling staff}.

{Object teaching}, a method of instruction, in which illustrative objects are employed, each new word or idea being accompanied by a representation of that which it signifies; -- used especially in the kindergarten, for young children. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Object — may refer to: Object (philosophy), a thing, being or concept Entity, something that is tangible and within the grasp of the senses As used in object relations theories of psychoanalysis, that to which a subject relates. Object (grammar), a… …   Wikipedia

  • object — ob·ject 1 / äb jikt/ n 1: something toward which thought, feeling, or action is directed see also natural object 2: the purpose or goal of something; esp in the civil law of Louisiana: the purpose for which a contract or obligation is formed… …   Law dictionary

  • object — object, objective nouns. Both words have the meaning ‘something sought or aimed at’ and in practice they are often interchangeable, although object is more common when followed by a qualifying construction, e.g. one with in or of (and is… …   Modern English usage

  • object — [äb′jikt, äbjekt; ] for v. [ əb jekt′, äbjekt′] n. [ME < ML objectum, something thrown in the way < L objectus, a casting before, that which appears, orig. pp. of objicere < ob (see OB ) + jacere, to throw: see JET1] 1. a thing that can… …   English World dictionary

  • Object — Ob*ject ([o^]b*j[e^]kt ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Objected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Objecting}.] [L. objectus, p. p. of objicere, obicere, to throw or put before, to oppose; ob (see {Ob }) + jacere to throw: cf. objecter. See {Jet} a shooting forth.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • object# — object n 1 *thing, article Analogous words: *affair, concern, matter, thing: *form, figure, shape, configuration 2 objective, goal, end, aim, design, purpose, *intention, intent Analogous words: * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • object — the noun [14] and object the verb [15] have diverged considerably over the centuries, but they come from the same ultimate source: Latin obicere. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix ob ‘towards’ and jacere ‘throw’ (source of English… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • object — [n1] thing able to be seen/felt/perceived article, body, bulk, commodity, doodad*, doohickey*, entity, fact, gadget, gizmo*, item, mass, matter, phenomenon, reality, something, substance, thingamajig*, volume, whatchamacallit*, widget*; concept… …   New thesaurus

  • object — the noun [14] and object the verb [15] have diverged considerably over the centuries, but they come from the same ultimate source: Latin obicere. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix ob ‘towards’ and jacere ‘throw’ (source of English… …   Word origins

  • object — ► NOUN 1) a material thing that can be seen and touched. 2) a person or thing to which an action or feeling is directed. 3) a goal or purpose. 4) Grammar a noun or noun phrase governed by a transitive verb or by a preposition. ► VERB ▪ express… …   English terms dictionary

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