Nuncupative testament
Nuncupative Nun*cu"pa*tive, a. [L. nuncupativus nominal: cf. F. nuncupatif.] 1. Publicly or solemnly declaratory. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

2. Nominal; existing only in name. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

3. Oral; not written. [1913 Webster]

{Nuncupative will} or {Nuncupative testament}, a will or testament made by word of mouth only, before witnesses, as by a soldier or seaman, and depending on oral testimony for proof. --Blackstone. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Nuncupative — Nun*cu pa*tive, a. [L. nuncupativus nominal: cf. F. nuncupatif.] 1. Publicly or solemnly declaratory. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. Nominal; existing only in name. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 3. Oral; not written. [1913 Webster] {Nuncupative will} or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Nuncupative will — Nuncupative Nun*cu pa*tive, a. [L. nuncupativus nominal: cf. F. nuncupatif.] 1. Publicly or solemnly declaratory. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. Nominal; existing only in name. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 3. Oral; not written. [1913 Webster] {Nuncupative… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Testament — Tes ta*ment, n. [F., fr. L. testamentum, fr. testari to be a witness, to make one s last will, akin to testis a witness. Cf. {Intestate}, {Testify}.] 1. (Law) A solemn, authentic instrument in writing, by which a person declares his will as to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • testament — Under the early English law, a term that referred to the disposition of personal property by will; i.e. by last will and testament. The words and testament are no longer necessary since a will now relates to both real and personal property. @… …   Black's law dictionary

  • testament — noun a) A solemn, authentic instrument in writing, by which a person declares his or her will as to disposal of his or her inheritance (estate and effects) after his or her death, benefiting specified heir(s). : Note: This is otherwise called a… …   Wiktionary

  • nuncupative will — noun a will or testament made by word of mouth only, before witnesses, as by a soldier or seaman, and depending on oral testimony for proof …   Wiktionary

  • nuncupative — [ nʌŋkjʊˌpətɪv] adjective Law (of a will or testament) declared orally, especially by a mortally wounded soldier or sailor. Origin C16: from late L. nuncupativus, from L. nuncupat , nuncupare declare …   English new terms dictionary

  • Holographic testament — Testament Tes ta*ment, n. [F., fr. L. testamentum, fr. testari to be a witness, to make one s last will, akin to testis a witness. Cf. {Intestate}, {Testify}.] 1. (Law) A solemn, authentic instrument in writing, by which a person declares his… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • military testament — noun or military will : nuncupative will …   Useful english dictionary

  • Legal history of wills — Wills in the Ancient WorldThe will, if not purely Roman in origin, at least owes to Roman law its complete development, a development which in most European countries was greatly aided at a later period by ecclesiastics versed in Roman law. In… …   Wikipedia

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