Nother
Nother Noth"er, conj. Neither; nor. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • nother — word formed from misdivision of ANOTHER (Cf. another) as a nother (see N (Cf. N) for other examples), c.1300. From 14c. 16c. no nother is sometimes encountered as a misdivision of none other or perhaps as an emphatic negative; Old English had… …   Etymology dictionary

  • 'nother — 7 [ nother] [ˈnʌðə(r)] [ˈnʌðər] adjective (non standard) = ↑another • …   Useful english dictionary

  • nother — oth er, a. Other; variant spelling used mostly in the phrase a whole nother (i. e., a completely different), as though formed by splitting the word another . [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • nother — [nuth′ər] adj. Slang different; not the same …   English World dictionary

  • Nother — This unusual surname of Anglo Saxon origin with variant spellings Noder, Nodder, is a nickname from the Olde English pre 7th Century naedre meaning adder . The nickname may have been given originally to someone thought to have a particularly… …   Surnames reference

  • nother — or nother adjective Etymology: alteration (from misdivision of another) of other, adjective Date: circa 1909 other used especially in the phrase a whole nother; used chiefly in speech or informal prose …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • nother — /ˈnʌðə/ (say nudhuh) phrase a whole nother..., Colloquial a completely different...: a whole nother idea. {a deliberate and emphatic aphetic transformation of UNKNOWN REF bigmac121654937 } …   Australian English dictionary

  • 'nother — adjective see nother …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • nother — /nudh euhr/, adj. Informal. a whole nother, an entirely different; a whole other. [1955 60; metanalysis of an other or another] * * * …   Universalium

  • nother — cvb noth•er [[t]ˈnʌð ər[/t]] adj. inf a whole nother, an entirely different; a whole other • Etymology: 1955–60; metanalysis of an other or another …   From formal English to slang

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