Newtonian telescope
Newtonian New*to"ni*an, a. Of or pertaining to Sir Isaac Newton, or his discoveries. [1913 Webster]

{Newtonian philosophy}, the philosophy of Sir Isaac Newton; -- applied to the doctrine of the universe as expounded in Newton's ``Principia,'' to the modern or experimental philosophy (as opposed to the theories of Descartes and others), and, most frequently, to the mathematical theory of universal gravitation.

{Newtonian telescope} (Astron.), a reflecting telescope, in which rays from the large speculum are received by a plane mirror placed diagonally in the axis, and near the open end of the tube, and thrown at right angles toward one side of the tube, where the image is formed and viewed through the eyeplace.

{Newtonian theory of light}. See Note under {Light}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Newtonian telescope — The Newtonian telescope is a type of reflecting telescope invented by the British scientist Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727), using a concave primary mirror and a flat diagonal secondary mirror. Newton’s first reflecting telescope was completed in… …   Wikipedia

  • Newtonian telescope — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Newtonian telescope — noun reflecting telescope in which the image is viewed through an eyepiece perpendicular to main axis • Syn: ↑Newtonian reflector • Hypernyms: ↑reflecting telescope, ↑reflector …   Useful english dictionary

  • Newtonian telescope — a reflecting telescope in which a mirror or reflecting prism is mounted on the axis near the eyepiece so that the image may be viewed from outside the telescope tube at right angles to the axis. [1755 65] * * * …   Universalium

  • Newtonian telescope — /njuˌtoʊniən ˈtɛləskoʊp/ (say nyooh.tohneeuhn teluhskohp) noun a telescope employing a reflecting parabolic objective mirror. {named after Sir Isaac Newton} …   Australian English dictionary

  • Telescope — Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Telescope carp — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Telescope fish — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Telescope fly — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Telescope shell — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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