New Zealand flax
Flax Flax (fl[a^]ks), n. [AS. fleax; akin to D. vlas, OHG. flahs, G. flachs, and prob. to flechten to braid, plait,m twist, L. plectere to weave, plicare to fold, Gr. ? to weave, plait. See {Ply}.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of the genus {Linum}, esp. the {L. usitatissimum}, which has a single, slender stalk, about a foot and a half high, with blue flowers. The fiber of the bark is used for making thread and cloth, called linen, cambric, lawn, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed from the seed. [1913 Webster]

2. The skin or fibrous part of the flax plant, when broken and cleaned by hatcheling or combing. [1913 Webster]

{Earth flax} (Min.), amianthus.

{Flax brake}, a machine for removing the woody portion of flax from the fibrous.

{Flax comb}, a hatchel, hackle, or heckle.

{Flax cotton}, the fiber of flax, reduced by steeping in bicarbonate of soda and acidulated liquids, and prepared for bleaching and spinning like cotton. --Knight.

{Flax dresser}, one who breaks and swingles flax, or prepares it for the spinner.

{Flax mill}, a mill or factory where flax is spun or linen manufactured.

{Flax puller}, a machine for pulling flax plants in the field.

{Flax wench}. (a) A woman who spins flax. [Obs.] (b) A prostitute. [Obs.] --Shak.

{Mountain flax} (Min.), amianthus.

{New Zealand flax} (Bot.) See {Flax-plant}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • New Zealand flax — New Zealand New Zea land A group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean. [1913 Webster] {New Zealand flax}. (a) (Bot.) A tall, liliaceous herb ({Phormium tenax}), having very long, sword shaped, distichous leaves which furnish a fine, strong fiber …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • new zealand flax — noun or new zealand hemp Usage: usually capitalized N&Z 1. : a tall New Zealand herb (Phormium tenax) having erect, sword shaped leaves and scarlet or yellow flowers 2. : the strong fiber from the leaves of New Zealand flax used chiefly for… …   Useful english dictionary

  • New Zealand-flax — pluoštinis zelandlinis statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Zelandlininių šeimos dekoratyvinis, pluoštinis augalas (Phormium tenax), paplitęs Naujojoje Zelandijoje. atitikmenys: lot. Phormium tenax angl. flax bush; harakeke; korari; New Zealand… …   Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas)

  • New Zealand flax — zelandlinis statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Zelandlininių (Phormiaceae) šeimos augalų gentis (Phormium). atitikmenys: lot. Phormium angl. New Zealand flax vok. neuseeländer Flachs rus. новозеландский лен; формиум lenk. len nowozelandzki;… …   Dekoratyvinių augalų vardynas

  • New Zealand flax — a large New Zealand plant, Phormium tenax, of the agave family, having showy, red margined, leathery leaves and dull red flowers, grown as an ornamental and for the fiber yielding leaves. Also called flax lily. [1805 15] * * * …   Universalium

  • New Zealand flax — noun a New Zealand plant, Phormium tenax, with a rosette of long stiff leaves from which is obtained a fibre used in making rope and twine. Also, New Zealand hemp …   Australian English dictionary

  • New Zealand flax — noun a New Zealand plant that yields fibre and is also grown as an ornamental. [Phormium tenax.] …   English new terms dictionary

  • New Zealand flax snail — Conservation status Vulnerable (IUCN 2.3)[1] …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand — New Zealander. /zee leuhnd/ a country in the S Pacific, SE of Australia, consisting of North Island, South Island, and adjacent small islands: a member of the Commonwealth of Nations. 3,587,275; 103,416 sq. mi. (267,845 sq. km). Cap.: Wellington …   Universalium

  • New Zealand — New Zea land A group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean. [1913 Webster] {New Zealand flax}. (a) (Bot.) A tall, liliaceous herb ({Phormium tenax}), having very long, sword shaped, distichous leaves which furnish a fine, strong fiber very… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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