Nervous fever
Nervous Nerv"ous (n[~e]rv"[u^]s), a. [L. nervosus sinewy, vigorous: cf. F. nerveux. See {Nerve}.] 1. Possessing nerve; sinewy; strong; vigorous. ``Nervous arms.'' --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. Possessing or manifesting vigor of mind; characterized by strength in sentiment or style; forcible; spirited; as, a nervous writer. [1913 Webster]

3. Of or pertaining to the nerves; seated in the nerves; as, nervous excitement; a nervous fever. [1913 Webster]

4. Having the nerves weak, diseased, or easily excited; subject to, or suffering from, undue excitement of the nerves; easily agitated or annoyed. [1913 Webster]

Poor, weak, nervous creatures. --Cheyne. [1913 Webster]

5. Sensitive; excitable; timid. [1913 Webster]

6. Apprehensive; as, a child nervous about his mother's reaction to his bad report card. [PJC]

Our aristocratic class does not firmly protest against the unfair treatment of Irish Catholics, because it is nervous about the land. --M. Arnold. [1913 Webster]

{Nervous fever} (Med.), a low form of fever characterized by great disturbance of the nervous system, as evinced by delirium, or stupor, disordered sensibility, etc.

{Nervous system} (Anat.), the specialized co["o]rdinating apparatus which endows animals with sensation and volition. In vertebrates it is often divided into three systems: the central, brain and spinal cord; the peripheral, cranial and spinal nerves; and the sympathetic. See {Brain}, {Nerve}, {Spinal cord}, under {Spinal}, and {Sympathetic system}, under {Sympathetic}, and Illust. in Appendix.

{Nervous temperament}, a condition of body characterized by a general predominance of mental manifestations. --Mayne. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Nervous — Nerv ous (n[ e]rv [u^]s), a. [L. nervosus sinewy, vigorous: cf. F. nerveux. See {Nerve}.] 1. Possessing nerve; sinewy; strong; vigorous. Nervous arms. Pope. [1913 Webster] 2. Possessing or manifesting vigor of mind; characterized by strength in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Nervous system — Nervous Nerv ous (n[ e]rv [u^]s), a. [L. nervosus sinewy, vigorous: cf. F. nerveux. See {Nerve}.] 1. Possessing nerve; sinewy; strong; vigorous. Nervous arms. Pope. [1913 Webster] 2. Possessing or manifesting vigor of mind; characterized by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Nervous temperament — Nervous Nerv ous (n[ e]rv [u^]s), a. [L. nervosus sinewy, vigorous: cf. F. nerveux. See {Nerve}.] 1. Possessing nerve; sinewy; strong; vigorous. Nervous arms. Pope. [1913 Webster] 2. Possessing or manifesting vigor of mind; characterized by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fever — (also known as pyrexia, from the Greek pyretos meaning fire, or a febrile response, from the Latin word febris , meaning fever, and archaically known as ague) is a frequent medical sign that describes an increase in internal body temperature to… …   Wikipedia

  • Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room — The Twilight Zone episode Jackie Rhoades in a strange mortal combat with himself …   Wikipedia

  • fever — late O.E. fefor, fefer fever, from L. febris fever, related to fovere to warm, heat, probably from PIE root *dhegh burn (Cf. Goth. dags, O.E. dæg day, originally the heat ); but some suggest a reduplication of a root represented by Skt. *bhur …   Etymology dictionary

  • fever — ► NOUN 1) an abnormally high body temperature, usually accompanied by shivering, headache, and in severe instances, delirium. 2) a state of nervous excitement or agitation. DERIVATIVES feverish adjective feverishly adverb feverishness noun.… …   English terms dictionary

  • nervous system disease — Introduction       any of the diseases or disorders that affect the functioning of the human nervous system (nervous system, human). Everything that humans sense, consider, and effect and all the unlearned reflexes of the body depend on the… …   Universalium

  • Fever — Although a fever technically is any body temperature above the normal of 98.6 degrees F. (37 degrees C.), in practice a person is usually not considered to have a significant fever until the temperature is above 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C.).… …   Medical dictionary

  • nervous system, human — ▪ anatomy Introduction       system that conducts stimuli from sensory receptors to the brain and spinal cord and that conducts impulses back to other parts of the body. As with other higher vertebrates, the human nervous system has two main… …   Universalium

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