Negative theorem
Theorem The"o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th['e]or[`e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913 Webster]

Not theories, but theorems (?), the intelligible products of contemplation, intellectual objects in the mind, and of and for the mind exclusively. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster]

By the theorems, Which your polite and terser gallants practice, I re-refine the court, and civilize Their barbarous natures. --Massinger. [1913 Webster]

2. (Math.) A statement of a principle to be demonstrated. [1913 Webster]

Note: A theorem is something to be proved, and is thus distinguished from a problem, which is something to be solved. In analysis, the term is sometimes applied to a rule, especially a rule or statement of relations expressed in a formula or by symbols; as, the binomial theorem; Taylor's theorem. See the Note under {Proposition}, n., 5. [1913 Webster]

{Binomial theorem}. (Math.) See under {Binomial}.

{Negative theorem}, a theorem which expresses the impossibility of any assertion.

{Particular theorem} (Math.), a theorem which extends only to a particular quantity.

{Theorem of Pappus}. (Math.) See {Centrobaric method}, under {Centrobaric}.

{Universal theorem} (Math.), a theorem which extends to any quantity without restriction. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Theorem — The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Theorem of Pappus — Theorem The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Negative binomial distribution — Probability mass function The orange line represents the mean, which is equal to 10 in each of these plots; the green line shows the standard deviation. notation: parameters: r > 0 number of failures until the experiment is stopped (integer,… …   Wikipedia

  • Negative feedback amplifier — Figure 1: Ideal negative feedback model A negative feedback amplifier (or more commonly simply a feedback amplifier) is an amplifier which combines a fraction of the output with the input so that a negative feedback opposes the original signal.… …   Wikipedia

  • Negative impedance converter — The negative impedance converter (NIC) is a one port op amp circuit acting as a negative load which injects energy into circuits in contrast to an ordinary load that consumes energy from them. This is achieved by adding or subtracting excessive… …   Wikipedia

  • Negative information — In robotics, Negative information is defined as the ascertained absence of evidence when evidence was expected. In quantum information science, Negative information is when sending quantum bits of a message from a transmitter to a receiver will… …   Wikipedia

  • Binomial theorem — Theorem The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Particular theorem — Theorem The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Universal theorem — Theorem The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Perron–Frobenius theorem — In linear algebra, the Perron–Frobenius theorem, proved by Oskar Perron (1907) and Georg Frobenius (1912), asserts that a real square matrix with positive entries has a unique largest real eigenvalue and that the corresponding… …   Wikipedia

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