Neckerchief
Neckerchief \Neck"er*chief\, n. [For neck kerchief.] A kerchief for the neck; -- called also {neck handkerchief}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • neckerchief — (n.) scarf for the neck, late 14c., from NECK (Cf. neck) (n.) + KERCHIEF (Cf. kerchief), which is, etymologically a covering for the head …   Etymology dictionary

  • neckerchief — ► NOUN ▪ a square of cloth worn round the neck …   English terms dictionary

  • neckerchief — [nek′ər chif, nek′ərchēf΄] n. [ME nekkyrchefe: see NECK & KERCHIEF] a handkerchief or scarf worn around the neck …   English World dictionary

  • Neckerchief — A Scouting neckerchief and woggle A neckerchief, necker or less commonly scarf is a type of neckwear associated with Scouts, cowboys and sailors. It consists of a triangular piece of cloth or a rectangular piece folded into a triangle. The long… …   Wikipedia

  • neckerchief — UK [ˈnekə(r)ˌtʃɪf] / US [ˈnekərˌtʃɪf] noun [countable] Word forms neckerchief : singular neckerchief plural neckerchiefs a square piece of cloth that is folded and tied round your neck …   English dictionary

  • neckerchief — noun A scarf that is worn looped or tied around the neck. The Boy Scout wore a red neckerchief, the ends clasped with a sliding knot ornament …   Wiktionary

  • neckerchief — [[t]ne̱kə(r)tʃiːf, tʃif[/t]] neckerchiefs N COUNT A neckerchief is a piece of cloth which is folded to form a triangle and worn round your neck …   English dictionary

  • neckerchief — noun (plural chiefs; also neckerchieves) Etymology: Middle English nekkerchef, from nekke + kerchef kerchief Date: 14th century a kerchief for the neck …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • neckerchief — /nek euhr chif, cheef /, n. a cloth or scarf worn round the neck. [1350 1400; ME; see NECK, KERCHIEF] * * * …   Universalium

  • neckerchief — neck|er|chief [ˈnekətʃi:f US ər ] n [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: neck + kerchief] a square piece of cloth that is folded and worn tied around the neck …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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