Neck and neck
Neck Neck (n[e^]k), n. [OE. necke, AS. hnecca; akin to D. nek the nape of the neck, G. nacken, OHG. nacch, hnacch, Icel. hnakki, Sw. nacke, Dan. nakke.] 1. The part of an animal which connects the head and the trunk, and which, in man and many other animals, is more slender than the trunk. [1913 Webster]

2. Any part of an inanimate object corresponding to or resembling the neck of an animal; as: (a) The long slender part of a vessel, as a retort, or of a fruit, as a gourd. (b) A long narrow tract of land projecting from the main body, or a narrow tract connecting two larger tracts. (c) (Mus.) That part of a violin, guitar, or similar instrument, which extends from the head to the body, and on which is the finger board or fret board. [1913 Webster]

3. (Mech.) A reduction in size near the end of an object, formed by a groove around it; as, a neck forming the journal of a shaft. [1913 Webster]

4. (Bot.) the point where the base of the stem of a plant arises from the root. [1913 Webster]

{Neck and crop}, completely; wholly; altogether; roughly and at once. [Colloq.]

{Neck and neck} (Racing), so nearly equal that one cannot be said to be before the other; very close; even; side by side.

{Neck of a capital}. (Arch.) See {Gorgerin}.

{Neck of a cascabel} (Gun.), the part joining the knob to the base of the breech.

{Neck of a gun}, the small part of the piece between the chase and the swell of the muzzle.

{Neck of a tooth} (Anat.), the constriction between the root and the crown.

{Neck or nothing} (Fig.), at all risks.

{Neck verse}. (a) The verse formerly read to entitle a party to the benefit of clergy, said to be the first verse of the fifty-first Psalm, ``Miserere mei,'' etc. --Sir W. Scott. (b) Hence, a verse or saying, the utterance of which decides one's fate; a shibboleth.

These words, ``bread and cheese,'' were their neck verse or shibboleth to distinguish them; all pronouncing ``broad and cause,'' being presently put to death. --Fuller.

{Neck yoke}. (a) A bar by which the end of the tongue of a wagon or carriage is suspended from the collars of the harnesses. (b) A device with projecting arms for carrying things (as buckets of water or sap) suspended from one's shoulders.

{On the neck of}, immediately after; following closely; on the heel of. ``Committing one sin on the neck of another.'' --W. Perkins.

{Stiff neck}, obstinacy in evil or wrong; inflexible obstinacy; contumacy. ``I know thy rebellion, and thy stiff neck.'' --Deut. xxxi. 27.

{To break the neck of}, to destroy the main force of; to break the back of. ``What they presume to borrow from her sage and virtuous rules . . . breaks the neck of their own cause.'' --Milton.

{To harden the neck}, to grow obstinate; to be more and more perverse and rebellious. --Neh. ix. 17.

{To tread on the neck of}, to oppress; to tyrannize over. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Neck and Neck — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Neck and Neck (homonymie). Neck and Neck Album par Mark Knopfler et Chet Atkins Sortie 1990 Durée 38:26 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Neck and Neck — Studio album by Chet Atkins and Mark Knopfler Released 1990 …   Wikipedia

  • neck and neck — {adj. or adv.}, {informal} Equal or nearly equal in a race or contest; abreast; tied. * /At the end of the race the two horses were neck and neck./ * /For months John and Harry seemed to be neck and neck in Alice s favor./ Compare: NIP AND TUCK …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • neck and neck — {adj. or adv.}, {informal} Equal or nearly equal in a race or contest; abreast; tied. * /At the end of the race the two horses were neck and neck./ * /For months John and Harry seemed to be neck and neck in Alice s favor./ Compare: NIP AND TUCK …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • neck and neck — If two competitors or candidates, etc, are neck and neck, then they are very close and neither is clearly winning …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • neck and neck — ► neck and neck level in a race or competition. Main Entry: ↑neck …   English terms dictionary

  • neck and neck — I adjective inconclusive as to outcome; close or just even in a race or comparison or competition as they approached the finish line they were neck and neck the election was a nip and tuck affair • Syn: ↑head to head, ↑nip and tuck • Similar to:… …   Useful english dictionary

  • neck and neck —    If two competitors or candidates, etc, are neck and neck, then they are very close and neither is clearly winning.   (Dorking School Dictionary)    ***    In a contest or competition, when two competitors reach the same level, they are neck… …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • neck\ and\ neck — adj. or adv informal Equal or nearly equal in a race or contest; abreast; tied. At the end of the race the two horses were neck and neck. For months John and Harry seemed to be neck and neck in Alice s favor. Compare: nip and tuck …   Словарь американских идиом

  • Neck and Neck — Para la marca española Neck and Neck véase la página Neck Neck Neck Neck Álbum musical de Chet Atkins Mark Knopfler Publicación octubre 1990 Género(s) Country Duració …   Wikipedia Español

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