Nature
Nature Na"ture (?; 135), n. [F., fr. L. natura, fr. natus born, produced, p. p. of nasci to be born. See {Nation}.] 1. The existing system of things; the universe of matter, energy, time and space; the physical world; all of creation. Contrasted with the world of mankind, with its mental and social phenomena. [1913 Webster +PJC]

But looks through nature up to nature's God. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

When, in the course of human Events, it becomes necessary for one People to dissolve the Political Bonds which have connected them with another, ans to assume among the powers of the earth the separate and equal Station which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent Respect to the Opinions of Mankind requires that they should declare the causes that impel them to the Separation. --Declaration of Independence

Nature has caprices which art can not imitate. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. The personified sum and order of causes and effects; the powers which produce existing phenomena, whether in the total or in detail; the agencies which carry on the processes of creation or of being; -- often conceived of as a single and separate entity, embodying the total of all finite agencies and forces as disconnected from a creating or ordering intelligence; as, produced by nature; the forces of nature. [1913 Webster]

I oft admire How Nature, wise and frugal, could commit Such disproportions. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. The established or regular course of things; usual order of events; connection of cause and effect. [1913 Webster]

4. Conformity to that which is natural, as distinguished from that which is artificial, or forced, or remote from actual experience. [1913 Webster]

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. The sum of qualities and attributes which make a person or thing what it is, as distinct from others; native character; inherent or essential qualities or attributes; peculiar constitution or quality of being. [1913 Webster]

Thou, therefore, whom thou only canst redeem, Their nature also to thy nature join, And be thyself man among men on earth. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

6. Hence: Kind, sort; character; quality. [1913 Webster]

A dispute of this nature caused mischief. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

7. Physical constitution or existence; the vital powers; the natural life. ``My days of nature.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Oppressed nature sleeps. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

8. Natural affection or reverence. [1913 Webster]

Have we not seen The murdering son ascend his parent's bed, Through violated nature force his way? --Pope. [1913 Webster]

9. Constitution or quality of mind or character. [1913 Webster]

A born devil, on whose nature Nurture can never stick. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

That reverence which is due to a superior nature. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

{Good nature}, {Ill nature}. see under {Good} and {Ill}.

{In a state of nature}. (a) Naked as when born; nude. (b) In a condition of sin; unregenerate. (c) Untamed; uncivilized.

{Nature printing}, a process of printing from metallic or other plates which have received an impression, as by heavy pressure, of an object such as a leaf, lace, or the like.

{Nature worship}, the worship of the personified powers of nature.

{To pay the debt of nature}, to die. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • nature — [ natyr ] n. f. • 1119; lat. natura I ♦ 1 ♦ (Qualifié) La nature de... Ensemble des caractères, des propriétés qui définissent un être, une chose concrète ou abstraite, généralement considérés comme constituant un genre. ⇒ essence; entité. « on… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Nature — еженедельный научный журнал Обложка журнала от 15 февраля 2001 года Специализация …   Википедия

  • nature — Nature. s. f. Tout l Univers, toutes les choses creées. Dieu est l autheur & le maistre de la nature. l ordre qui regne dans toute la nature. il n y a rien de si beau dans toute la nature, dans toute l estenduë de la nature que le soleil. toute… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Nature — • Has reference to the production of things, and hence generally includes in its connotation the ideas of energy and activity. Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Nature     Nature    …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • nature — Nature, Natura. La nature et maniere de faire, qu un chacun a de nature, Ingenium. Bonne nature, Bonitas ingenij, Bonum ingenium. Nature pleine de vices, Mendosa natura. La nature et vertu des arbres et des herbes, Arborum atque herbarum natura.… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Nature — Beschreibung Fachzeitschrift Fachgebiet Naturwissenschaften Sprache Englisch …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • nature — (n.) late 13c., restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth; from O.Fr. nature nature, being, principle of life; character, essence, from L. natura course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • nature — The phrase of a…nature, with an adjective before nature, should be used sparingly and only when the adjective by itself will not serve for some reason. For example, a theologian of an enigmatic nature could easily be rephrased as an enigmatic… …   Modern English usage

  • nature — [nā′chər] n. [OFr < L natura < natus, born, produced: see GENUS] 1. the essential character of a thing; quality or qualities that make something what it is; essence 2. inborn character; innate disposition; inherent tendencies of a person 3 …   English World dictionary

  • nature — ► NOUN 1) the physical world, including plants, animals, the landscape, and natural phenomena, as opposed to humans or human creations. 2) the inherent qualities or characteristics of a person or thing. 3) a kind, sort, or class: topics of a… …   English terms dictionary

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