N2


N2
Nitrogen Ni`tro*gen (n[imac]"tr[-o]*j[e^]n), n. [L. nitrum natron + -gen: cf. F. nitrog[`e]ne. See {Niter}.] (Chem.) A colorless nonmetallic element of atomic number 7, tasteless and odorless, comprising four fifths of the atmosphere by volume in the form of molecular nitrogen ({N2}). It is chemically very inert in the free state, and as such is incapable of supporting life (hence the name {azote} still used by French chemists); but it forms many important compounds, such as ammonia, nitric acid, the cyanides, etc, and is a constituent of all organized living tissues, animal or vegetable. Symbol N. Atomic weight 14.007. It was formerly regarded as a permanent noncondensible gas, but was liquefied in 1877 by Cailletet of Paris, and Pictet of Geneva, and boils at -195.8 [deg] C at atmospheric pressure. Liquid nitrogen is used as a refrigerant to store delicate materials, such as bacteria, cells, and other biological materials. [1913 Webster +PJC]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


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