Muscle plasma
Plasma Plas"ma, n. [See {Plasm}.] 1. (Min.) A variety of quartz, of a color between grass green and leek green, which is found associated with common chalcedony. It was much esteemed by the ancients for making engraved ornaments. [1913 Webster]

2. (Biol.) The viscous material of an animal or vegetable cell, out of which the various tissues are formed by a process of differentiation; protoplasm. [1913 Webster]

3. Unorganized material; elementary matter. [1913 Webster]

4. (Med.) A mixture of starch and glycerin, used as a substitute for ointments. --U. S. Disp. [1913 Webster]

5. same as {blood plasma}. [PJC]

6. (physics) a state of matter in which charged particles such as electrons and atomi nuclei have sufficiently high energy to move freely, rather than be bound in atoms as in ordinary matter; it has some of the properties of a gas, but is a conductor of electricity.

Note: In a typical plasma, the number of positive and negative particles are approximately equal. Plasmas are found naturally in the atmosphere of stars, and can be created in special laboratory apparatus. [PJC]

{Blood plasma} (Physiol.), the colorless fluid of the blood, in which the red and white blood corpuscles are suspended. It may be obtained by centrifuation of blood to remove the blood cells. It is distinguished from {serum} in that plasma still has the fibrin of blood, and may be clotted, while in serum the fibrin has been removed.

{Muscle plasma} (Physiol.), the fundamental part of muscle fibers, a thick, viscid, albuminous fluid contained within the sarcolemma, which on the death of the muscle coagulates to a semisolid mass. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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