Astoned
Aston As*ton", Astone As*tone", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Astoned}, {Astond}, or {Astound}.] [See {Astonish}.] To stun; to astonish; to stupefy. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • astoned — astonished. RG. 396 …   Oldest English Words

  • astoned — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Aston — As*ton , Astone As*tone , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Astoned}, {Astond}, or {Astound}.] [See {Astonish}.] To stun; to astonish; to stupefy. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Astond — Aston As*ton , Astone As*tone , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Astoned}, {Astond}, or {Astound}.] [See {Astonish}.] To stun; to astonish; to stupefy. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Astone — Aston As*ton , Astone As*tone , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Astoned}, {Astond}, or {Astound}.] [See {Astonish}.] To stun; to astonish; to stupefy. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Astound — Aston As*ton , Astone As*tone , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Astoned}, {Astond}, or {Astound}.] [See {Astonish}.] To stun; to astonish; to stupefy. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Astound — As*tound , a. [OE. astouned, astound, astoned, p. p. of astone. See {Astone}.] Stunned; astounded; astonished. [Archaic] Spenser. [1913 Webster] Thus Ellen, dizzy and astound. As sudden ruin yawned around. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • astound — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English astoned, from past participle of astonen Date: 14th century archaic overwhelmed with astonishment or amazement ; astounded II. transitive verb Date: 1603 to fill with bewilderment or wonder Synonyms: see… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • astound — [17] Astound, astonish, and stun all come ultimately from the same origin: a Vulgar Latin verb *extonāre, which literally meant something like ‘leave someone thunderstruck’ (it was formed from the Latin verb tonāre ‘thunder’). This became Old… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • astonish — c.1300, astonien, from O.Fr. estoner to stun, daze, deafen, astound, from V.L. *extonare, from L. ex out + tonare to thunder (see THUNDER (Cf. thunder)); so, lit. to leave someone thunderstruck. The modern form (influenced by English verbs in ish …   Etymology dictionary

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