Most an end
Most Most (m[=o]st), a., superl. of {More}. [OE. most, mast, mest, AS. m[=ae]st; akin to D. meest, OS. m[=e]st, G. meist, Icel. mestr, Goth. maists; a superl. corresponding to E. more. [root]103. See {More}, a.] 1. Consisting of the greatest number or quantity; greater in number or quantity than all the rest; nearly all. ``Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness.'' --Prov. xx. 6. [1913 Webster]

The cities wherein most of his mighty works were done. --Matt. xi. 20. [1913 Webster]

2. Greatest in degree; as, he has the most need of it. ``In the moste pride.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

3. Highest in rank; greatest. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Note: Most is used as a noun, the words part, portion, quantity, etc., being omitted, and has the following meanings: 1. The greatest value, number, or part; preponderating portion; highest or chief part. 2. The utmost; greatest possible amount, degree, or result; especially in the phrases to make the most of, at the most, at most. [1913 Webster]

A quarter of a year or some months at the most. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

A covetous man makes the most of what he has. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster]

{For the most part}, in reference to the larger part of a thing, or to the majority of the persons, instances, or things referred to; as, human beings, for the most part, are superstitious; the view, for the most part, was pleasing.

{Most an end}, generally. See {An end}, under {End}, n. [Obs.] ``She sleeps most an end.'' --Massinger. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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