Mortality
Mortality Mor*tal"i*ty, n. [L. mortalitas: cf. F. mortalit['e].] 1. The condition or quality of being mortal; subjection to death or to the necessity of dying. [1913 Webster]

When I saw her die, I then did think on your mortality. --Carew. [1913 Webster]

2. Human life; the life of a mortal being. [1913 Webster]

From this instant There 's nothing serious in mortality. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Those who are, or that which is, mortal; the human race; humanity; human nature. [1913 Webster]

Take these tears, mortality's relief. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. Death; destruction. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. The whole sum or number of deaths in a given time or a given community; also, the proportion of deaths to population, or to a specific number of the population; death rate; as, a time of great, or low, mortality; the mortality among the settlers was alarming. [1913 Webster]

{Bill of mortality}. See under {Bill}.

{Law of mortality}, a mathematical relation between the numbers living at different ages, so that from a given large number of persons alive at one age, it can be computed what number are likely to survive a given number of years.

{Table of mortality}, a table exhibiting the average relative number of persons who survive, or who have died, at the end of each year of life, out of a given number supposed to have been born at the same time. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mortality — mortality, mortality rate The death rate, usually standardized by age and sex, to facilitate comparisons between areas and social groups. It provides a measure of health risks, improvements in the quality of health care, and the comparative… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • Mortality — is the condition of being mortal, or susceptible to death; the opposite of immortality. It may also refer to: Mortality rate, a measure of the number of deaths in a given population Case mortality rate, a measure of the number of deaths among a… …   Wikipedia

  • mortality — I noun condicio mortalis, death, destruction, evanescence, extinction, fatality, fugaciousness, fugacity, human race, humanity, humanness, impermanence, man, mankind, mortalitas, mortalness, subjection to death, temporary existence, transientness …   Law dictionary

  • mortality — [n1] death bloodshed, carnage, deadliness, destruction, dying, extinction, fatality, killing, lethality, loss of life; concept 407 Ant. birth, life mortality [n2] humanness being, ephemerality, flesh, Homo sapiens, humanity, humankind, human race …   New thesaurus

  • mortality — ► NOUN 1) the state of being mortal. 2) death, especially on a large scale. 3) (also mortality rate) the number of deaths in a given area or period, or from a particular cause …   English terms dictionary

  • mortality — [môr tal′ə tē] n. [ME mortalite < OFr < L mortalitas < mortalis,MORTAL] 1. the condition of being mortal; esp., the nature of a human being, as having eventually to die 2. death on a large scale, as from disease or war 3. a) the… …   English World dictionary

  • mortality — mortality. См. смертность. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • mortality — (n.) mid 14c., condition of being mortal, from O.Fr. mortalite massacre, slaughter; fatal illness; poverty; destruction (12c.), from L. mortalitem (nom. mortalitas) state of being mortal; subjection to death, from mortalis (see MORTAL (Cf.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Mortality — A fatal outcome or, in one word, death. The word mortality is derived from mortal which came from the Latin mors (death). The opposite of mortality is, of course, immortality. Mortality is also quite distinct from morbidity (illness). A condition …   Medical dictionary

  • mortality — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ high, low ▪ Poor hygiene led to high mortality among children. ▪ early, premature ▪ a condition that often results in premature mortality …   Collocations dictionary

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