Month
Month Month (m[u^]nth), n. [OE. month, moneth, AS. m[=o]n[eth], m[=o]na[eth]; akin to m[=o]na moon, and to D. maand month, G. monat, OHG. m[=a]n[=o]d, Icel. m[=a]nu[eth]r, m[=a]na[eth]r, Goth. m[=e]n[=o][thorn]s. [root]272. See {Moon}.] One of the twelve portions into which the year is divided; the twelfth part of a year, corresponding nearly to the length of a synodic revolution of the moon, -- whence the name. In popular use, a period of four weeks is often called a month. [1913 Webster]

Note: In the common law, a month is a lunar month, or twenty-eight days, unless otherwise expressed. --Blackstone. In the United States the rule of the common law is generally changed, and a month is declared to mean a calendar month. --Cooley's Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

{A month mind}. (a) A strong or abnormal desire. [Obs.] --Shak. (b) A celebration made in remembrance of a deceased person a month after death. --Strype.

{Calendar months}, the months as adjusted in the common or Gregorian calendar; April, June, September, and November, containing 30 days, and the rest 31, except February, which, in common years, has 28, and in leap years 29.

{Lunar month}, the period of one revolution of the moon, particularly a synodical revolution; but several kinds are distinguished, as the {synodical month}, or period from one new moon to the next, in mean length 29 d. 12 h. 44 m. 2.87 s.; the {nodical month}, or time of revolution from one node to the same again, in length 27 d. 5 h. 5 m. 36 s.; the {sidereal}, or time of revolution from a star to the same again, equal to 27 d. 7 h. 43 m. 11.5 s.; the {anomalistic}, or time of revolution from perigee to perigee again, in length 27 d. 13 h. 18 m. 37.4 s.; and the {tropical}, or time of passing from any point of the ecliptic to the same again, equal to 27 d. 7 h. 43 m. 4.7 s.

{Solar month}, the time in which the sun passes through one sign of the zodiac, in mean length 30 d. 10 h. 29 m. 4.1 s. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • month — [ mʌnθ ] noun count *** 1. ) one of the 12 periods that a year is divided into, such as January, February, etc: CALENDAR MONTH: during the winter months the month of March Could we meet earlier in the month? this/next/last month: A man was… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • month — W1S1 [mʌnθ] n [: Old English; Origin: monath] 1.) one of the 12 named periods of time that a year is divided into this/last/next month ▪ Phil is coming home for a visit next month. ▪ She ll be thirteen this month. ▪ I hope I ll have finished the… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • month — [munth] n. [ME < OE monath, akin to Ger monat, ON manuthr < Gmc * menōth < IE * mēnōt, month, moon, var. of mēn: see MOON] 1. any of the main parts (usually twelve) into which the calendar year is divided: also calendar month 2. a) the… …   English World dictionary

  • Month — in Hieroglyphen Ideogramm …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • month — (n.) O.E. monað, from P.Gmc. *menoth (Cf. O.S. manoth, O.Fris. monath, M.Du. manet, Du. maand, O.H.G. manod, Ger. Monat, O.N. manaðr, Goth. menoþs month ), related to *menon moon (see MOON ( …   Etymology dictionary

  • month — ► NOUN 1) each of the twelve named periods into which a year is divided. 2) a period of time between the same dates in successive calendar months. 3) a period of 28 days or four weeks. ● a month of Sundays Cf. ↑a month of Sundays ORIGIN …   English terms dictionary

  • month — month; month·ly; …   English syllables

  • Month — (Montu), ägypt. Gott, der in Theben und in Hermonthis in Oberägypten als Stadtgott verehrt wurde. Er wird sperberköpfig, mit der Sonne und zwei langen Federn auf dem Haupte dargestellt und hält in der Hand das Sichelschwert. Wie die meisten… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Month — Month, ägypt. Kriegsgott, namentlich in der oberägypt. Stadt Hermonthis verehrt …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Month — For the Egyptian hawk god, see Monthu. A month is a unit of time, used with calendars, which was first used and invented in Mesopotamia, as a natural period related to the motion of the Moon; month and Moon are cognates. The traditional concept… …   Wikipedia

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