Money order
Money Mon"ey, n.; pl. {Moneys}. [OE. moneie, OF. moneie, F. monnaie, fr. L. moneta. See {Mint} place where coin is made, {Mind}, and cf. {Moidore}, {Monetary}.] 1. A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin. [1913 Webster]

To prevent such abuses, . . . it has been found necessary . . . to affix a public stamp upon certain quantities of such particular metals, as were in those countries commonly made use of to purchase goods. Hence the origin of coined money, and of those public offices called mints. --A. Smith. [1913 Webster]

2. Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling. [1913 Webster]

3. Any article used as a medium of payment in financial transactions, such as checks drawn on checking accounts. [PJC]

4. (Economics) Any form of wealth which affects a person's propensity to spend, such as checking accounts or time deposits in banks, credit accounts, letters of credit, etc. Various aggregates of money in different forms are given different names, such as {M-1}, the total sum of all currency in circulation plus all money in demand deposit accounts (checking accounts). [PJC]

Note: Whatever, among barbarous nations, is used as a medium of effecting exchanges of property, and in the terms of which values are reckoned, as sheep, wampum, copper rings, quills of salt or of gold dust, shovel blades, etc., is, in common language, called their money. [1913 Webster]

4. In general, wealth; property; as, he has much money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, money. [1913 Webster]

The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil. --1 Tim vi. 10 (Rev. Ver. ). [1913 Webster]

{Money bill} (Legislation), a bill for raising revenue.

{Money broker}, a broker who deals in different kinds of money; one who buys and sells bills of exchange; -- called also {money changer}.

{Money cowrie} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of {Cypr[ae]a} (esp. {Cypr[ae]a moneta}) formerly much used as money by savage tribes. See {Cowrie}.

{Money of account}, a denomination of value used in keeping accounts, for which there may, or may not, be an equivalent coin; e. g., the mill is a money of account in the United States, but not a coin.

{Money order}, (a) an order for the payment of money; specifically, a government order for the payment of money, issued at one post office as payable at another; -- called also {postal money order}. (b) a similar order issued by a bank or other financial institution.

{Money scrivener}, a person who procures the loan of money to others. [Eng.]

{Money spider}, {Money spinner} (Zo["o]l.), a small spider; -- so called as being popularly supposed to indicate that the person upon whom it crawls will be fortunate in money matters.

{Money's worth}, a fair or full equivalent for the money which is paid.

{A piece of money}, a single coin.

{Ready money}, money held ready for payment, or actually paid, at the time of a transaction; cash.

{plastic money}, credit cards, usually made out of plastic; also called {plastic}; as, put it on the plastic.

{To make money}, to gain or acquire money or property; to make a profit in dealings. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • money order — n: an order issued by a post office, bank, or telegraph office for payment of a specified sum of money usu. at any branch of the issuing organization Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. money order …   Law dictionary

  • Money order — Order Or der, n. [OE. ordre, F. ordre, fr. L. ordo, ordinis. Cf. {Ordain}, {Ordinal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system; as: (a) Of material things, like the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • money order — money orders N COUNT A money order is a piece of paper representing a sum of money which you can buy at a post office and send to someone as a way of sending them money by post. [AM] (in BRIT, use postal,der) …   English dictionary

  • money order — money .order n an official document that you buy in a post office or a bank and send to someone so that they can exchange it for money in a bank →↑postal order …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • money order — (See postal money order.) …   Glossary of postal terms

  • money order — n. an order for the payment of a specified sum of money, as one issued for a fee at one post office, telegraph office, or bank and payable at another …   English World dictionary

  • money order — money ,order noun count an official document that you buy in a POST OFFICE as a safe way of sending money to someone …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • money order — ► NOUN ▪ a printed order for payment of a specified sum, issued by a bank or post office …   English terms dictionary

  • Money order — postal money order: Duchy of Brunswick, 1867 A money order is a payment order for a pre specified amount of money. Because it is required that the funds be prepaid for the amount shown on it, it is a more trusted method of payment than a personal …   Wikipedia

  • money order — noun a written order for the payment of a sum to a named individual; obtainable and payable at a post office (Freq. 1) • Syn: ↑postal order • Hypernyms: ↑draft, ↑bill of exchange, ↑order of payment * * * noun, pl ⋯ ders [count] …   Useful english dictionary

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