Moil
Moil Moil, v. i. [From {Moil} to daub; prob. from the idea of struggling through the wet.] To soil one's self with severe labor; to work with painful effort; to labor; to toil; to drudge. [1913 Webster]

Moil not too much under ground. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

Now he must moil and drudge for one he loathes. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Moil — Moil, n. A spot; a defilement. [1913 Webster] The moil of death upon them. Mrs. Browning. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Moil — Moil, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Moiled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Moiling}.] [OE. moillen to wet, OF. moillier, muillier, F. mouller, fr. (assumed) LL. molliare, fr. L. mollis soft. See {Mollify}.] To daub; to make dirty; to soil; to defile. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • moil — [moil] vi. [ME moillen, to moisten, make wet < OFr moillier < VL * molliare, to soften < L mollis, soft: see MOLLIFY] Dial. to toil; drudge vt. Archaic to moisten or soil n. 1. drudgery; hard work 2. confusion; turmoil moiler n …   English World dictionary

  • moil — index commotion Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • moil — bro·moil; moil·er; moil·ey; tur·moil·er; moil; tur·moil; moil·ing·ly; …   English syllables

  • moil — {{11}}moil (n.) toil, labor, 1612, from from MOIL (Cf. moil) (v.). {{12}}moil (v.) to labour in the mire [Johnson], c.1400, from O.Fr. moillier to wet, moisten (12c., Mod.Fr. mouiller), from V.L. *molliare, from L. mollis soft, from PIE *mel soft …   Etymology dictionary

  • moil — 1) In glassblowing, the bit of glass that surrounds the pipe that cannot be used. The goblet broke because the moil got too cold and cracked. 2) The orange oily substance that bubbles to the top of bolognese sauce whilst cooking or left standing …   Dictionary of american slang

  • moil — 1) In glassblowing, the bit of glass that surrounds the pipe that cannot be used. The goblet broke because the moil got too cold and cracked. 2) The orange oily substance that bubbles to the top of bolognese sauce whilst cooking or left standing …   Dictionary of american slang

  • moil — [[t]mɔɪl[/t]] v. i. 1) to work hard; drudge 2) cvb to whirl or eddy 3) cvb archaic to wet or smudge 4) drudgery 5) turmoil • Etymology: 1350–1400; ME moillen to make or get wet and muddy < MF moillier < VL *molliāre, der. of L mollis soft… …   From formal English to slang

  • moil — v. & n. archaic v.intr. drudge (esp. toil and moil). n. drudgery. Etymology: ME f. OF moillier moisten, paddle in mud, ult. f. L mollis soft …   Useful english dictionary

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