Mode
Mode Mode (m[=o]d), n. [L. modus a measure, due or proper measure, bound, manner, form; akin to E. mete: cf. F. mode. See {Mete}, and cf. {Commodious}, {Mood} in grammar, {Modus}.] 1. Manner of doing or being; method; form; fashion; custom; way; style; as, the mode of speaking; the mode of dressing. [1913 Webster]

The duty of itself being resolved on, the mode of doing it may easily be found. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

A table richly spread in regal mode. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. Prevailing popular custom; fashion, especially in the phrase the mode. [1913 Webster]

The easy, apathetic graces of a man of the mode. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

3. Variety; gradation; degree. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. (Metaph.) Any combination of qualities or relations, considered apart from the substance to which they belong, and treated as entities; more generally, condition, or state of being; manner or form of arrangement or manifestation; form, as opposed to {matter}. [1913 Webster]

Modes I call such complex ideas, which, however compounded, contain not in them the supposition of subsisting by themselves, but are considered as dependencies on, or affections of, substances. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

5. (Logic) The form in which the proposition connects the predicate and subject, whether by simple, contingent, or necessary assertion; the form of the syllogism, as determined by the quantity and quality of the constituent proposition; mood. [1913 Webster]

6. (Gram.) Same as {Mood}. [1913 Webster]

7. (Mus.) The scale as affected by the various positions in it of the minor intervals; as, the Dorian mode, the Ionic mode, etc., of ancient Greek music. [1913 Webster]

Note: In modern music, only the major and the minor mode, of whatever key, are recognized. [1913 Webster]

8. A kind of silk. See {Alamode}, n. [1913 Webster]

9. (Gram.) the value of the variable in a frequency distribution or probability distribution, at which the probability or frequency has a maximum. The maximum may be local or global. Distributions with only one such maximum are called {unimodal}; with two maxima, {bimodal}, and with more than two, {multimodal}. [PJC]

Syn: Method; manner. See {Method}. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • mode — mode …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • MODE — Un examen rapide de la définition du mot «mode» montre qu’à ce terme deux autres vocables sont souvent associés: le «monde» (pour société ou univers) et la «modernité». Dérivée du substantif latin modus (façon d’être passagère) et de l’adverbe… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • mode — 1. (mo d ) s. m. 1°   Terme de philosophie. Manière d être qui ne peut exister indépendamment des substances, quoiqu elle puisse être conçue à part abstraitement. •   Le mode est un accident que l on conçoit nécessairement dépendant de quelque… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Mode — (aus dem Französischen mode; lat. modus ‚Maß‘ bzw. ‚Art‘, eigentlich ‚Gemessenes‘ bzw. ‚Erfasstes‘) bezeichnet die in einem bestimmten Zeitraum und einer bestimmten Gruppe von Menschen als zeitgemäß geltende Art, bestimmte Dinge zu tun, Dinge zu… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • mode — [məʊd ǁ moʊd] noun 1. [countable] a way or means of doing something: mode of • susbsidies that support environmentally friendly modes of transport such as cycling • traditionalmodes of communication ˌmode of ˈpayment modes of payment …   Financial and business terms

  • mode — W3 [məud US moud] n [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: modus measure, way ] 1.) formal a particular way or style of behaving, living or doing something mode of ▪ the most efficient mode of transport ▪ They have a relaxed mode of life that suits… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • mode — [ moud ] noun ** ▸ 1 way of living/doing something ▸ 2 way machine works ▸ 3 art/clothes/etc. fashion ▸ 4 in music ▸ 5 way of behaving 1. ) count a particular way of doing something: mode of: an efficient mode of production E mail is becoming an… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Mode — (franz., v. lat. modus, engl. Fashion), die Lebensformen, sofern sie weder durch nationale Überlieferung noch durch zwingende Erwägungen, sondern durch wechselnde Tageslaunen bestimmt werden. Das Gebiet, auf dem die M. am unbestrittensten… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Mode — Sf std. (17. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus frz. mode m./f. besonders in der Formel à la mode nach der (gegenwärtig bevorzugten) Art . Zunächst auf die Kleider bezogen, dann verallgemeinert. Das französische Wort geht zurück auf l. modus m. Maß,… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • mode — [mo:t] <aus engl. mode »eine Art Grau«, eigtl. »Mode(farbe)« zu mode »Mode«, dies aus fr. mode, vgl. 1↑Mode> bräunlich …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

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