Misdivision
Misdivision \Mis`di*vi"sion\, n. Wrong division. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • misdivision — misdivision. См. аномальное деление. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • misdivision — (n.) 1835, from MIS (Cf. mis ) (1) + DIVISION (Cf. division) …   Etymology dictionary

  • misdivision — n. * * * …   Universalium

  • misdivision — mis·di·vi·sion …   English syllables

  • misdivision — |misdə̇|vizhən, stə̇ noun Etymology: mis (I) + division 1. : wrong or incorrect division (as of a word) 2. : an abnormal transverse division of a centromere that results in the formation of two telocentric chromosomes from a single metacentric… …   Useful english dictionary

  • centromere misdivision — centromere misdivision. См. неправильное деление центромер. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • аномальное деление — misdivision, abnormal division неправильное (аномальное) деление. Деление клетки, характеризующееся теми или иными нарушениями нормального процесса, обусловленными различными факторами (действие ионизирующего излучения, химических мутагенов,… …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • Juncture loss — (also known as junctural metanalysis, false splitting, misdivision, refactorization, or rebracketing) is the linguistic process by which two words (often an article and a noun) become partially or wholly affixed. Some examples would be if a… …   Wikipedia

  • Rebracketing — For the process by which the elements of a word are given new meanings, see Folk etymology. Contents 1 Role in forming new words 2 Examples 3 …   Wikipedia

  • Atack — This unusual and interesting surname is of Anglo Saxon origin, and is from a topographical name for someone who lived near an oak tree or in an oak wood, derived from the Middle English (1200 1500) oke , oak, from the Olde English pre 7th Century …   Surnames reference

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”