Miring
Mire Mire, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mired} (m[imac]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Miring}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause or permit to stick fast in mire; to plunge or fix in mud; as, to mire a horse or wagon. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence: To stick or entangle; to involve in difficulties; -- often used in the passive or predicate form; as, we got mired in bureaucratic red tape and it took years longer than planned. [PJC]

3. To soil with mud or foul matter. [1913 Webster]

Smirched thus and mired with infamy. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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