Metonymic
Metonymic Met`o*nym"ic, Metonymical Met`o*nym"ic*al, a. [See {Metonymy}.] Used by way of metonymy; using the name of one thing for that of another with which it is closely associated. -- {Met`o*nym"ic*al*ly}, adv. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • metonymic — metonym ► NOUN ▪ a word or expression used as a substitute for something with which it is closely associated, e.g. Washington for the US government. DERIVATIVES metonymic adjective metonymy noun. ORIGIN from Greek met numia change of name …   English terms dictionary

  • metonymic — adjective using the name of one thing for that of another with which it is closely associated to say he spent the evening reading Shakespeare is metonymic because it substitutes the author himself for the author s works • Syn: ↑metonymical •… …   Useful english dictionary

  • metonymic — adjective see metonymy …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • metonymic — See metonymy. * * * …   Universalium

  • metonymic — metÉ™ nɪmɪk adj. having the nature of metonymy, of or pertaining to the use of a related word to represent another word that it does not specifically denote (Rhetoric) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • metonymic — met·o·nym·ic …   English syllables

  • metonymic — /mɛtəˈnɪmɪk/ (say metuh nimik) adjective having the nature of metonymy. Also, metonymical. –metonymically, adverb …   Australian English dictionary

  • Metonymical — Metonymic Met o*nym ic, Metonymical Met o*nym ic*al, a. [See {Metonymy}.] Used by way of metonymy; using the name of one thing for that of another with which it is closely associated. {Met o*nym ic*al*ly}, adv. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Metonymically — Metonymic Met o*nym ic, Metonymical Met o*nym ic*al, a. [See {Metonymy}.] Used by way of metonymy; using the name of one thing for that of another with which it is closely associated. {Met o*nym ic*al*ly}, adv. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fewell — Metonymic job descriptive nickname surnames were very popular in medieval times, and this may be an example. If so, it derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century Fugol meaning a domestic fowl or in fact a breeder or seller of Fowls . The… …   Surnames reference

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