Mediately Me"di*ate*ly, adv. In a mediate manner; by a secondary cause or agent; not directly or primarily; by means; -- opposed to {immediately}. [1913 Webster]

God worketh all things amongst us mediately. --Sir W. Raleigh. [1913 Webster]

The king grants a manor to A, and A grants a portion of it to B. In this case. B holds his lands immediately of A, but mediately of the king. --Blakstone. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mediately — adverb /ˈmiːdiətli/ In a mediate manner; by the intervention of an intermediary agent or means; by indirect mediation; indirectly. He derived his impressions of things not directly from them, but mediately from other peoples impressions about… …   Wiktionary

  • mediately — adverb see mediate I …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • mediately — See mediate. * * * …   Universalium

  • mediately — mɪːdɪətlɪ adv. via a mediator, with the help of an intermediary …   English contemporary dictionary

  • mediately — me·di·ate·ly …   English syllables

  • mediately — adverb see mediate I …   Useful english dictionary

  • mediate — mediately, adv. mediateness, n. v. /mee dee ayt /; adj. /mee dee it/, v., mediated, mediating, adj. v.t. 1. to settle (disputes, strikes, etc.) as an intermediary between parties; reconcile. 2. to bring about (an agreement, accord, truce, peace,… …   Universalium

  • Immediately — Im*me di*ate*ly, adv. 1. In an immediate manner; without intervention of any other person or thing; proximately; directly; opposed to {mediately}; as, immediately contiguous. [1913 Webster] God s acceptance of it either immediately by himself, or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rule in Shelley's Case — The Rule in Shelley s Case is a rule of law that may apply to certain future interests in real property and trusts created in common law jurisdictions. [Moynihan, Cornelius, Introduction to the Law of Real Property , 3d Edition, West Group (St.… …   Wikipedia

  • Quia Emptores — (medieval Latin for because the buyers , the incipit of the document) was a statute passed by Edward I of England in 1290 that prevented tenants from alienating their lands to others by subinfeudation. Quia Emptores, along with its companion… …   Wikipedia

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