Ascribe As*cribe", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ascribed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ascribing}.] [L. ascribere, adscribere, to ascribe; ad + scribere to write: cf. OF. ascrire. See {Scribe}.] 1. To attribute, impute, or refer, as to a cause; as, his death was ascribed to a poison; to ascribe an effect to the right cause; to ascribe such a book to such an author. [1913 Webster]

The finest [speech] that is ascribed to Satan in the whole poem. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

2. To attribute, as a quality, or an appurtenance; to consider or allege to belong. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To {Ascribe}, {Attribute}, {Impute}.

Usage: Attribute denotes, 1. To refer some quality or attribute to a being; as, to attribute power to God. 2. To refer something to its cause or source; as, to attribute a backward spring to icebergs off the coast. Ascribe is used equally in both these senses, but involves a different image. To impute usually denotes to ascribe something doubtful or wrong, and hence, in general literature, has commonly a bad sense; as, to impute unworthy motives. The theological sense of impute is not here taken into view. [1913 Webster]

More than good-will to me attribute naught. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Ascribes his gettings to his parts and merit. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

And fairly quit him of the imputed blame. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ascribing — n. attribution, reference, assigning as·cribe || É™ skraɪb v. attribute to, charge to …   English contemporary dictionary

  • ascribing — …   Useful english dictionary

  • ascribing importance — attributing significance …   English contemporary dictionary

  • anthropopathy — Ascribing human feelings or traits to God or to the gods …   Grandiloquent dictionary

  • ascribe — transitive verb (ascribed; ascribing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ascribere, from ad + scribere to write more at scribe Date: 15th century to refer to a supposed cause, source, or author • ascribable adjective Synonyms: ascribe,… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Kant: Critique of Judgement — Patrick Gardiner Kant’s third Critique, the Critique of Judgement, was published in 1790 and was intended as he himself put it to bring his “entire critical undertaking to a close.” So conceived, it was certainly in part designed to build upon… …   History of philosophy

  • Anaxagoras and the atomists — C.C.W.Taylor ANAXAGORAS In the course of the fifth century BC the political and cultural pre eminence of Athens attracted to the city a considerable number of intellectuals of various kinds from all over the Greek world. This phenomenon, the so… …   History of philosophy

  • Discourse on the Method — Part of a series on …   Wikipedia

  • Scythian monks — were a community of monks from the region around the mouth of the Danube, who played an influential role in Christian life between the fourth and the sixth century, shaping modern Christian dogma and the Christian calendar through their works.… …   Wikipedia

  • ascription — /euh skrip sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of ascribing. 2. a statement ascribing something, esp. praise to the Deity. Also, adscription. [1590 1600; < L ascription (s. of ascriptio) a written addition. See A 5, SCRIPT, ION] * * * …   Universalium

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”