Matter of fact

Matter of fact
Fact Fact (f[a^]kt), n. [L. factum, fr. facere to make or do. Cf. {Feat}, {Affair}, {Benefit}, {Defect}, {Fashion}, and {-fy}.] 1. A doing, making, or preparing. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

A project for the fact and vending Of a new kind of fucus, paint for ladies. --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

2. An effect produced or achieved; anything done or that comes to pass; an act; an event; a circumstance. [1913 Webster]

What might instigate him to this devilish fact, I am not able to conjecture. --Evelyn. [1913 Webster]

He who most excels in fact of arms. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. Reality; actuality; truth; as, he, in fact, excelled all the rest; the fact is, he was beaten. [1913 Webster]

4. The assertion or statement of a thing done or existing; sometimes, even when false, improperly put, by a transfer of meaning, for the thing done, or supposed to be done; a thing supposed or asserted to be done; as, history abounds with false facts. [1913 Webster]

I do not grant the fact. --De Foe. [1913 Webster]

This reasoning is founded upon a fact which is not true. --Roger Long. [1913 Webster]

Note: The term fact has in jurisprudence peculiar uses in contrast with law; as, attorney at law, and attorney in fact; issue in law, and issue in fact. There is also a grand distinction between law and fact with reference to the province of the judge and that of the jury, the latter generally determining the fact, the former the law. --Burrill --Bouvier. [1913 Webster]

{Accessary before the fact}, or {Accessary after the fact}. See under {Accessary}.

{Matter of fact}, an actual occurrence; a verity; used adjectively: of or pertaining to facts; prosaic; unimaginative; as, a matter-of-fact narration.

Syn: Act; deed; performance; event; incident; occurrence; circumstance. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • matter of fact — see matter Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. matter of fact …   Law dictionary

  • Matter of fact — Matter Mat ter, n. [OE. matere, F. mati[ e]re, fr. L. materia; perh. akin to L. mater mother. Cf. {Mother}, {Madeira}, {Material}.] 1. That of which anything is composed; constituent substance; material; the material or substantial part of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • matter-of-fact — adj showing no emotion when you are talking about something exciting, frightening, upsetting etc matter of fact about ▪ Jan was surprisingly matter of fact about her divorce. matter of fact voice/tone ▪ Use a matter of fact tone when disciplining …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • matter-of-fact — also matter of fact, 1570s as a noun, originally a legal term (translating L. res facti), that portion of an enquiry concerned with the truth or falsehood of alleged facts, opposed to matter of law. As an adjective from 1712. Meaning prosaic,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • matter-of-fact — adjective showing no emotion when dealing with something upsetting, exciting, etc. a. used about someone s behavior or voice: a matter of fact tone ╾ ,matter of factly adverb ╾ ,matter of factness noun uncount …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • matter-of-fact — matter of factly, adv. matter of factness, n. /mat euhr euhv fakt /, adj. 1. adhering strictly to fact; not imaginative; prosaic; dry; commonplace: a matter of fact account of the political rally. 2. direct or unemotional; straightforward; down… …   Universalium

  • matter-of-fact — [mat΄ər əv fakt′] adj. sticking strictly to facts; literal, unimaginative, unemotional, prosaic, etc. matter of factly adv. matter of factness n …   English World dictionary

  • Matter-of-fact — Mat ter of fact , a. Adhering to facts; not turning aside from absolute realities; not fanciful or imaginative; commonplace; dry. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • matter-of-fact — index pragmatic Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • matter-of-fact — *prosaic, prosy Analogous words: stolid, phlegmatic, *impassive: arid, *dry: downright, *forthright Contrasted words: fanciful, *imaginary, fantastic, chimerical, quixotic, visionary: ideal, transcendent, transcendental (see …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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