Mala in se
Mala Ma"la, n. pl.; pl. of {Malum}. [L.] Evils; wrongs; offenses against right and law. [1913 Webster]

{Mala in se} [L.] (Law), offenses which are such from their own nature, at common law, irrespective of statute.

{Mala prohibita} [L.] (Law), offenses prohibited by statute, as distinguished from {mala in se}, which are offenses at common law. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mala in se — pl of malum in se Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. mala in se …   Law dictionary

  • mala in se — Inherently wicked, naturally evil, as adjudged by the sense of a civilized community; illegal from the very nature of the transaction, upon principles of natural, moral, and public law; immoral in its nature and injurious in its consequences,… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • mala in se — plural of malum in se …   Useful english dictionary

  • mala in se — /maela in siy/ Wrongs in themselves; acts morally wrong; offenses against conscience …   Black's law dictionary

  • mala in se — /maela in siy/ Wrongs in themselves; acts morally wrong; offenses against conscience …   Black's law dictionary

  • acts mala in se — See mala in se …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • contracts mala in se — Contracts which are absolutely void because the acts to be performed thereunder are immoral, iniquitous, and contrary to a sound public policy, as well as in violation of statute. 17 Am J2d Contr § 167 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • in se — In itself; in themselves. See mala in se …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • malum in se — inˈsā noun (plural mala in se) Etymology: New Latin, offense in itself : an offense that is evil or wrong from its own nature or by the natural law irrespective of statute compare malum prohibitum …   Useful english dictionary

  • malum in se — mal·um in se / ma ləm in sē, mä lu̇m in sā/ n pl mala in se / ma lə , mä / [New Latin, offense in itself]: an offense that is evil or wrong from its own nature irrespective of statute often used with a preceding noun (as crime or act ) held that… …   Law dictionary

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