Lyam
Lyam \Ly"am\, n. [See {Leam}.] A leash. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lyam — Her. A *charge representing the leash of a dog. [< Lat. ligamen = a string or fastening, ligament] See Lymer …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • lyam — ly·am …   English syllables

  • lyam — ˈlīəm noun ( s) Etymology: Middle English lyame, lyeme, from Middle French liem leash, bond, from Latin ligamen band, tie more at lien archaic : leash …   Useful english dictionary

  • Lyam ConDoin — is a fictional character appearing in the books of Raymond E. Feist.DescriptionAs a youth Lyam was tall and powerfully built with blonde hair shoulder length hair and a closely trimmed beard. He had his mother s smile and always looked on the… …   Wikipedia

  • Lyam conDoin — Lyam est un personnage secondaire de la saga de fantasy Les Chroniques de Krondor par Raymond E. Feist. Il devient roi des Isles après la mort du roi Rodric IV. Lyam est le fils aîné de Borric conDoin et Catherine, et frère d Arutha et de Carline …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Lyam hound — Lyam A bloodhound. It was so named after the lyam or leash used by its handler during a hunt. The lyam hound was used to track game, e.g. deer or boar, by scent. Cf. Lyam; Brachet; Greyhound; Lymer …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • lyam-hound — or lyme hound noun Etymology: obsolete lyam leash Date: 1527 archaic bloodhound …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • lyam-hound — /luy euhm hownd /, n. Archaic. a bloodhound. Also, lyme hound. [1520 30; obs. lyam leash ( < MF liem L ligamen a band, tie, equiv. to liga(re) to tie + men n. suffix) + HOUND1] * * * …   Universalium

  • lyam-hound — ˈ ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷ˌ ̷ ̷ noun archaic : bloodhound …   Useful english dictionary

  • Liam — Lyam A bloodhound. It was so named after the lyam or leash used by its handler during a hunt. The lyam hound was used to track game, e.g. deer or boar, by scent. Cf. Lyam; Brachet; Greyhound; Lymer …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”