Luted
Lute Lute, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Luted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Luting}.] To close or seal with lute; as, to lute on the cover of a crucible; to lute a joint. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • luted — luːt n. stringed instrument with a pear shaped body and a long fretted neck; sealing compound; tool for spreading and smoothing concrete v. play a lute; seal holes with putty; smooth with a trowel …   English contemporary dictionary

  • luted — …   Useful english dictionary

  • lute — lute1 /looht/, n., v., luted, luting. n. 1. a stringed musical instrument having a long, fretted neck and a hollow, typically pear shaped body with a vaulted back. v.i. 2. to play a lute. v.t. 3. to perform (music) on a lute: a musician skilled… …   Universalium

  • lute — I. /lut / (say looht) noun 1. a stringed musical instrument formerly much used, having a long, fretted neck and a hollow, typically pear shaped body with a vaulted back, the strings being plucked with the fingers of one hand (or struck with a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • lute — lute1 [lo͞ot′] n. [ME < MFr lut < OFr leüt < Prov läut < Ar alʼūd, lit., the wood] an old stringed instrument related to the guitar, with a body shaped like half a pear and six to thirteen strings stretched along the fretted neck,… …   English World dictionary

  • Lute — Lute, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Luted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Luting}.] To close or seal with lute; as, to lute on the cover of a crucible; to lute a joint. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Luting — Lute Lute, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Luted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Luting}.] To close or seal with lute; as, to lute on the cover of a crucible; to lute a joint. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Unlute — Un*lute , v. t. [1st pref. un + lute.] To separate, as things cemented or luted; to take the lute or the clay from. Boyle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • convolute — verb ( luted; luting) Etymology: Latin convolutus, past participle of convolvere Date: 1698 twist, coil …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • involute — I. adjective Etymology: Latin involutus concealed, from past participle of involvere Date: 1661 1. a. curled spirally b. (1) curled or curved inward (2) having the edges rolled over the upper surface toward the midrib < an involute leaf > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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