Lout Lout, v. t. To treat as a lout or fool; to neglect; to disappoint. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


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  • Lout — Développeur Jeffrey H. Kingston Dernière version 3 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Lout — Entwickler Jeffrey H. Kingston Aktuelle Version 3.38 (15. Oktober 2008) Betriebssystem Plattformunabhängig Programmier­sprache C …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • lout — lout·ish; lout; lout·ish·ly; lout·ish·ness; …   English syllables

  • Lout — (lout), v. i. [OE. louten, luten, AS. l[=u]tan; akin to Icel. l[=u]ta, Dan. lude, OHG. l[=u]z[=e]n to lie hid.] To bend; to box; to stoop. [Archaic] Chaucer. Longfellow. [1913 Webster] He fair the knight saluted, louting low. Spenser. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lout — lout1 [lout] n. [prob. < or akin to ME lutien, to lurk < OE lutian, akin to lutan: see LOUT2] an awkward, ill mannered person; boor vt. Obs. to treat with contempt; flout loutish adj. loutishly adv. loutishness n. lout2 [lout] vi., vt …   English World dictionary

  • Lout — Lout, n. [Formerly also written lowt.] A clownish, awkward fellow; a bumpkin. Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lout — [laut] n [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: Perhaps from Old Norse lutr bent down ] a rude, violent man = ↑yob >loutish adj ▪ loutish behaviour >loutishly adv >loutishness n …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • lout — [ laut ] noun count FORMAL an unpleasant young man who behaves badly, especially in public => LAGER LOUT …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • lout — ► NOUN ▪ an uncouth or aggressive man or boy. DERIVATIVES loutish adjective. ORIGIN perhaps from archaic lout «to bow down» …   English terms dictionary

  • lout — (n.) 1540s, awkward fellow, clown, bumpkin, perhaps from a dialectal survival of M.E. louten (v.) bow down (c.1300), from O.E. lutan bow low, from P.Gmc. *lut to bow, bend, stoop (Cf. O.N. lutr stooping, which might also be the source of the… …   Etymology dictionary

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