Arrest of judgment
Arrest Ar*rest", n. [OE. arest, arrest, OF. arest, F. arr[^e]t, fr. arester. See {Arrest}, v. t., {Arr?t}.] 1. The act of stopping, or restraining from further motion, etc.; stoppage; hindrance; restraint; as, an arrest of development. [1913 Webster]

As the arrest of the air showeth. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. (Law) The taking or apprehending of a person by authority of law; legal restraint; custody. Also, a decree, mandate, or warrant. [1913 Webster]

William . . . ordered him to be put under arrest. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

[Our brother Norway] sends out arrests On Fortinbras; which he, in brief, obeys. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Note: An arrest may be made by seizing or touching the body; but it is sufficient in the party be within the power of the officer and submit to the arrest. In Admiralty law, and in old English practice, the term is applied to the seizure of property. [1913 Webster]

3. Any seizure by power, physical or moral. [1913 Webster]

The sad stories of fire from heaven, the burning of his sheep, etc., . . . were sad arrests to his troubled spirit. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

4. (Far.) A scurfiness of the back part of the hind leg of a horse; -- also named rat-tails. --White. [1913 Webster]

{Arrest of judgment} (Law), the staying or stopping of a judgment, after verdict, for legal cause. The motion for this purpose is called a motion in arrest of judgment. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • arrest of judgment — arrest of judg·ment [arrest stoppage]: a judge s stopping of a judgment because of a defect (as that the acts proven do not constitute a crime) for which the judgment could be reversed Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996.… …   Law dictionary

  • Arrest of judgment — Judgment Judg ment, n. [OE. jugement, F. jugement, LL. judicamentum, fr. L. judicare. See {Judge}, v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of judging; the operation of the mind, involving comparison and discrimination, by which a knowledge of the values …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Arrest of judgment — (engl., spr. Ärrest of dschodschment), Hinderung des Urtels. Dieses dem Englischen Rechte eigenthümliche Verfahren ist a) im Civilprocesse dem Gegner nach Schluß des Beweisverfahrens u. nach dem über das Thatsächliche des Rechtsstreits bereits… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Arrest of judgment — (engl., spr. arrést of dschöddsch ), im engl. Strafprozeß die Hemmung der Vollstreckung eines gefällten Strafurteils, die dadurch bewirkt wird, daß der verurteilte Angeschuldigte eine nochmalige Prüfung des Erkenntnisses beantragt. Das A.… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • arrest of judgment — A remedy by motion for a party against whom a verdict has been rendered. A remedy solely for the defendant under the earlier practice where a judgment non obstante veredicto was available only for a plaintiff. 30A Am J Rev ed Judgm § 292.… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • arrest of judgment — The act of staying a judgment, or refusing to render judgment in an action at law and in criminal cases, after verdict, for some matter intrinsic appearing on the face of the record, which would render the judgment, if given, erroneous or… …   Black's law dictionary

  • arrest of judgment — The act of staying a judgment, or refusing to render judgment in an action at law and in criminal cases, after verdict, for some matter intrinsic appearing on the face of the record, which would render the judgment, if given, erroneous or… …   Black's law dictionary

  • arrest of judgment — the staying or stopping of a judgment after verdict for legal cause …   Useful english dictionary

  • motion for arrest of judgment — n. A motion asking the court to overrule the judgment in a civil or criminal case, on the grounds that it was granted in error. Webster s New World Law Dictionary. Susan Ellis Wild. 2000 …   Law dictionary

  • arrest — ar·rest 1 /ə rest/ n [Middle French arest, from arester to stop, seize, arrest, ultimately from Latin ad to, at + restare to stay]: the restraining and seizure of a person whether or not by physical force by someone acting under authority (as a… …   Law dictionary

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