logger-headed turtle
Loggerhead Log"ger*head`, n. [Log + head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a numskull. --Shak. Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle, used to heat tar. [1913 Webster]

3. (Naut.) An upright piece of round timber, in a whaleboat, over which a turn of the line is taken when it is running out too fast. --Ham. Nav. Encyc. [1913 Webster]

4. (Zo["o]l.) A very large marine turtle ({Thalassochelys caretta} syn. {Thalassochelys caouana}), common in the warmer parts of the Atlantic Ocean, from Brazil to Cape Cod; -- called also {logger-headed turtle}. [1913 Webster]

5. (Zo["o]l.) An American shrike ({Lanius Ludovicianus}), similar to the butcher bird, but smaller. See {Shrike}. [1913 Webster]

{To be at loggerheads}, {To fall to loggerheads}, or {To go to loggerheads}, to quarrel; to be at strife. --L' Estrange. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Lanius Ludovicianus — Loggerhead Log ger*head , n. [Log + head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a numskull. Shak. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle, used to heat tar. [1913 Webster] 3. (Naut.) An upright piece of round timber, in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Loggerhead — Log ger*head , n. [Log + head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a numskull. Shak. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle, used to heat tar. [1913 Webster] 3. (Naut.) An upright piece of round timber, in a whaleboat, over… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Thalassochelys caouana — Loggerhead Log ger*head , n. [Log + head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a numskull. Shak. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle, used to heat tar. [1913 Webster] 3. (Naut.) An upright piece of round timber, in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Thalassochelys caretta — Loggerhead Log ger*head , n. [Log + head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a numskull. Shak. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle, used to heat tar. [1913 Webster] 3. (Naut.) An upright piece of round timber, in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be at loggerheads — Loggerhead Log ger*head , n. [Log + head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a numskull. Shak. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle, used to heat tar. [1913 Webster] 3. (Naut.) An upright piece of round timber, in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall to loggerheads — Loggerhead Log ger*head , n. [Log + head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a numskull. Shak. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle, used to heat tar. [1913 Webster] 3. (Naut.) An upright piece of round timber, in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go to loggerheads — Loggerhead Log ger*head , n. [Log + head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a numskull. Shak. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle, used to heat tar. [1913 Webster] 3. (Naut.) An upright piece of round timber, in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • loggerhead — noun 1》 (also loggerhead turtle) a large headed reddish brown turtle of warm seas. [Caretta caretta.] 2》 archaic a foolish person. Phrases at loggerheads in violent dispute or disagreement. [perh. a use of loggerhead in the 17th cent. sense long… …   English new terms dictionary

  • loggerhead — loggerheaded, adj. /law geuhr hed , log euhr /, n. 1. a thick headed or stupid person; blockhead. 2. See loggerhead turtle. 3. See loggerhead shrike. 4. a ball or bulb of iron with a long handle, used, after being heated, to melt tar, heat… …   Universalium

  • loggerhead — 1580s, stupid person, blockhead, perhaps from dialectal logger heavy block of wood + head (n.). Later it meant a thick headed iron tool (1680s), a type of cannon shot, a type of turtle (1650s). Loggerheads fighting, fisticuffs is from 1670s, but… …   Etymology dictionary

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