Literary property
Property Prop"er*ty, n.; pl. {Properties}. [OE. proprete, OF. propret['e] property, F. propret['e] neatness, cleanliness, propri['e]t['e] property, fr. L. proprietas. See {Proper}, a., and cf. {Propriety}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which is proper to anything; a peculiar quality of a thing; that which is inherent in a subject, or naturally essential to it; an attribute; as, sweetness is a property of sugar. [1913 Webster]

Property is correctly a synonym for peculiar quality; but it is frequently used as coextensive with quality in general. --Sir W. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

Note: In physical science, the properties of matter are distinguished to the three following classes: 1. Physical properties, or those which result from the relations of bodies to the physical agents, light, heat, electricity, gravitation, cohesion, adhesion, etc., and which are exhibited without a change in the composition or kind of matter acted on. They are color, luster, opacity, transparency, hardness, sonorousness, density, crystalline form, solubility, capability of osmotic diffusion, vaporization, boiling, fusion, etc. 2. Chemical properties, or those which are conditioned by affinity and composition; thus, combustion, explosion, and certain solutions are reactions occasioned by chemical properties. Chemical properties are identical when there is identity of composition and structure, and change according as the composition changes. 3. Organoleptic properties, or those forming a class which can not be included in either of the other two divisions. They manifest themselves in the contact of substances with the organs of taste, touch, and smell, or otherwise affect the living organism, as in the manner of medicines and poisons. [1913 Webster]

2. An acquired or artificial quality; that which is given by art, or bestowed by man; as, the poem has the properties which constitute excellence. [1913 Webster]

3. The exclusive right of possessing, enjoying, and disposing of a thing; ownership; title. [1913 Webster]

Here I disclaim all my paternal care, Propinquity and property of blood. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Shall man assume a property in man? --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster]

4. That to which a person has a legal title, whether in his possession or not; thing owned; an estate, whether in lands, goods, or money; as, a man of large property, or small property. [1913 Webster]

5. pl. All the adjuncts of a play except the scenery and the dresses of the actors; stage requisites. [1913 Webster]

I will draw a bill of properties. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. Propriety; correctness. [Obs.] --Camden. [1913 Webster]

{Literary property}. (Law) See under {Literary}.

{Property man}, one who has charge of the ``properties'' of a theater. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • literary property — The interest of an author in an original and expressive composition, that entitles the author to the exclusive use and profit thereof, with no interest vested in any other individual. The corporal property in which an intellectual production is… …   Law dictionary

  • literary property — ➔ property * * * literary property UK US noun [C or U] LAW ► someone s written or printed work, protected by law from being copied and sold by someone else: »The statute relocated the origin of literary property from the publisher to the author.… …   Financial and business terms

  • Literary property — Literary Lit er*a*ry (l[i^]t [ e]r*[asl]*r[y^]), a. [L. litterarius, literarius, fr. littera, litera, a letter: cf. F. litt[ e]raire. See {Letter}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Of or pertaining to letters or literature; pertaining to learning or learned… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Literary property — The term literary property is used in publishing to refer to works generally covered by copyright but also an associated set of property rights that go far beyond what courts have historically permitted to be claimed as copyright infringement.The …   Wikipedia

  • literary property — The right which entitles an author and his assigns to all the use and profit of his composition, to which no independent right is, through any act or omission on his or their part, vested in another person. The exclusive right of owner to possess …   Black's law dictionary

  • literary property — The right which entitles an author and his assigns to all the use and profit of his composition, to which no independent right is, through any act or omission on his or their part, vested in another person. The exclusive right of owner to possess …   Black's law dictionary

  • literary property — noun 1. a. : the property an author or those claiming under him has in the written product of his intellectual skill and labor either before or after general publication and either at common law or under statutory copyright b. : the written… …   Useful english dictionary

  • literary property — An intellectual conception embodied in a form whereby it may be disseminated by the production of multiple copies. 18 Am J2d Copyr § 2. The interest of an author, or of those who claim under him, in his works, whether before or after publication… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • right of literary property — index copyright Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • dedication of literary property — Publication without a copyright notice or without any step taken toward obtaining protection of the work by a copyright. Deward & Rich v Bristol Sav. & Loan Corp. (CA4 Va) 120 F2d 537 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”