Liquate
Liquate Li"quate, v. t. (Metal.) To separate by fusion, as a more fusible from a less fusible material. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Liquate — Li quate (l[imac] kw[=a]t), v. i. [L. liquatus, p. p. of liquare to melt.] To melt; to become liquid. [Obs.] Woodward. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • liquate — [lī′kwāt΄] vt. liquated, liquating [< L liquatus, pp. of liquare, to melt, akin to liquere: see LIQUID] Metallurgy to heat (a metal, etc.) in order to separate a fusible substance from one less fusible liquation n …   English World dictionary

  • liquate — transitive verb (liquated; liquating) Etymology: Latin liquatus, past participle of liquare to make liquid; akin to Latin liquēre Date: circa 1859 to cause (a more fusible substance) to separate out of a combination or mixture by the application… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • liquate — /ˈlaɪkweɪt/ (say luykwayt) verb (t) (liquated, liquating) 1. to heat (a metal, etc.) sufficiently to melt the more fusible portion and so separate a metal from impurities or other metals. –phrase 2. liquate out, to separate by such a fusion.… …   Australian English dictionary

  • liquate — liquation /luy kway sheuhn, zheuhn/, n. /luy kwayt/, v., liquated, liquating. Metall. v.t. 1. to heat (an alloy or mixture) sufficiently to melt the more fusible matter and thus to separate it from the rest, as in the refining of tin. v.i. 2. to… …   Universalium

  • liquate — li·quate || laɪkweɪt v. become liquid, melt; separate by melting …   English contemporary dictionary

  • liquate — tequila …   Anagrams dictionary

  • liquate — [lɪ kweɪt] verb Metallurgy separate or purify (a metal) by melting it. Derivatives liquation noun Origin C19: from L. liquat , liquare make liquid …   English new terms dictionary

  • liquate — li·quate …   English syllables

  • liquate — li•quate [[t]ˈlaɪ kweɪt[/t]] v. t. quat•ed, quat•ing mel to heat (an alloy or mixture) sufficiently to melt the more fusible matter and thus to separate it from the rest • Etymology: 1660–70; < L liquātus, ptp. of liquāre to liquefy. See… …   From formal English to slang

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