Licorice sugar
Licorice Lic"o*rice (l[i^]k"[-o]*r[i^]s), n. [OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky`rriza; glyky`s sweet + "ri`za root. Cf. {Glycerin}, {Glycyrrhiza}, {Wort}.] [Written also {liquorice}.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of the genus {Glycyrrhiza} ({Glycyrrhiza glabra}), the root of which abounds with a sweet juice, and is much used in demulcent compositions. [1913 Webster]

2. The inspissated juice of licorice root, used as a confection and for medicinal purposes. [1913 Webster]

{Licorice fern} (Bot.), a name of several kinds of polypody which have rootstocks of a sweetish flavor.

{Licorice sugar}. (Chem.) See {Glycyrrhizin}.

{Licorice weed} (Bot.), the tropical plant {Scapania dulcis}.

{Mountain licorice} (Bot.), a kind of clover ({Trifolium alpinum}), found in the Alps. It has large purplish flowers and a sweetish perennial rootstock.

{Wild licorice}. (Bot.) (a) The North American perennial herb {Glycyrrhiza lepidota}. (b) Certain broad-leaved cleavers ({Galium circ[ae]zans} and {Galium lanceolatum}). (c) The leguminous climber {Abrus precatorius}, whose scarlet and black seeds are called {black-eyed Susans}. Its roots are used as a substitute for those of true licorice ({Glycyrrhiza glabra}). [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Licorice — Lic o*rice (l[i^]k [ o]*r[i^]s), n. [OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky rriza; glyky s sweet + ri za root. Cf. {Glycerin}, {Glycyrrhiza}, {Wort}.] [Written also {liquorice}.] 1. (Bot.) A plant …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Licorice fern — Licorice Lic o*rice (l[i^]k [ o]*r[i^]s), n. [OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky rriza; glyky s sweet + ri za root. Cf. {Glycerin}, {Glycyrrhiza}, {Wort}.] [Written also {liquorice}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Licorice weed — Licorice Lic o*rice (l[i^]k [ o]*r[i^]s), n. [OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky rriza; glyky s sweet + ri za root. Cf. {Glycerin}, {Glycyrrhiza}, {Wort}.] [Written also {liquorice}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • licorice powder — n a laxative composed of powdered senna and licorice, sulfur, fennel oil, and sugar …   Medical dictionary

  • licorice — /lik euhr ish, lik rish, lik euh ris/, n. 1. a Eurasian plant, Glycyrrhiza glabra, of the legume family. 2. the sweet tasting, dried root of this plant or an extract made from it, used in medicine, confectionery, etc. 3. a candy flavored with… …   Universalium

  • Sugar Daddy (1999 song) — Infobox Song Name = Sugar Daddy Artist = John Cameron Mitchell Album = Hedwig and the Angry Inch Original Cast Album Released = 1999 track no = 4 Recorded = Genre = Rock Cast recording Length = 4:27 Writer = Stephen Trask Label = Atlantic… …   Wikipedia

  • licorice powder — noun : a laxative composed of powdered senna and licorice, sulfur, fennel oil, and sugar …   Useful english dictionary

  • Mountain licorice — Licorice Lic o*rice (l[i^]k [ o]*r[i^]s), n. [OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky rriza; glyky s sweet + ri za root. Cf. {Glycerin}, {Glycyrrhiza}, {Wort}.] [Written also {liquorice}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wild licorice — Licorice Lic o*rice (l[i^]k [ o]*r[i^]s), n. [OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky rriza; glyky s sweet + ri za root. Cf. {Glycerin}, {Glycyrrhiza}, {Wort}.] [Written also {liquorice}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • American Licorice — Taxobox name = American Licorice image width = 240px regnum = Plantae divisio = Magnoliophyta classis = Magnoliopsida ordo = Fabales familia = Fabaceae genus = Glycyrrhiza species = G. lepidota binomial = Glycyrrhiza lepidota binomial authority …   Wikipedia

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